Source: Jurriaan Maessen

In a twisted exercise in deceiving semantics Co-chair and trustee of the Melinda and Bill Gates Foundation Melinda Gates attempted to counter the growing criticism in regards to the Foundation’s efforts in the Third World. During a speech she gave at the TEDx Change in Berlin yesterday, the wife of Microsoft founder and “philanthropist” Bill Gates characterised all criticism of the Foundation’s adventures in the third world as dangerous, especially the charge that the foundation is actively but covertly involved in population control. Gates described the charge as so dangerous in fact, that the criticism“has led to much suffering and death.”

“Some people worry that the real goal is to control populations.”, Gates stated. “All these side issues have attached themselves to the core idea that men and women should be able to decide when to have a child. As a result, birth control has almost disappeared from the global health agenda.”, the audience was told.

“The greatest victims”, Gates continued, “have been in sub-Saharan Africa and the poorest parts of South Asia which contraceptives are frequently unavailable.”

Gates also said that “some people think contraceptives are code for abortion, which they’re not. Some people are uncomfortable because contraceptives have to do with sex.”

Speaking of “code” at a 2006 gathering of top globalists devoted to the “family planning agenda” under the umbrella-name “Demographic Dynamics and Socio-Economic Development”, professor of Medical Demography at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, John Cleland, admitted to the fact that they should cease using coded language when communicating to the general public. The gathering was attended by the usual suspects. Representatives were present of the United Nations Population Fund, the International Planned Parenthood Foundation, the European Commission, the World Bank and, last but not least, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

“No more shrouding our statements in code.”, the professor said. “Because code just confuses people.”, the professor said (page 33 in the document).