Source: Kurt Nimmo

How best to scare people away from alternative media? Make them think Drudge Report and Infowars.com web pages contain malicious software.

In April, White House Senior Advisor Dan Pfeiffer tried to steer traffic away from the Drudge Report. His effort directed more traffic to the website.

During a news conference last year, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney instructed a reporter to “be mindful of your sources” when asked about the Drudge Report and a rumor about Mitt Romney.

More traffic flowed to Drudge.

Despite the best efforts of Obamaites and Democrats to diss Drudge and put a dent in the web site’s popularity, millions of folks peruse the site daily.

Back in March of 2010, the Senate’s Committee on Environment and Public Works sent out an email stating Drudge’s website was “responsible for the many viruses popping up throughout the Senate,” according to a CNet report.

No appreciable drop in viewership ensued.

Ditto Infowars.com. In recent weeks, a large number of critics led by spurious reports posted on the Southern Poverty Law Center’s website and elsewhere have posted stories accusing Alex Jones and Infowars.com of fomenting some kind of rightwing terror campaign and distributing baseless conspiracy theories.

No matter. Following the attack, millions of people flocked to the website to get the other side of the story on everything from Sandy Hook to the Boston bombings.

Now Google Chrome tags Infowars.com as a malware distributor.

It is a tactic destined to failure.

The CNet article posted on March 9, 2010 reported that the malware allegedly distributed by the Drudge Report actually came from DoubleClick, a subsidiary of Google which develops and provides internet ad serving services. It serves customers like Microsoft, General Motors, Coca-Cola, Motorola, Apple Inc., Visa USA, Nike and dozen of others.

So, when are we going to hear that large transnational corporations are purveyors of malware?

Is it possible Google will advise web travelers to avoid their websites?