Egypt's Civil Aviation Minister Sherif Fathy speaks, after an EgyptAir plane vanished from radar en route from Paris to Cairo, during a news conference at headquarters of ministry in Cairo, Egypt May 19, 2016. (Reuters Photo)

Source: Press TV

Egypt’s Civil Aviation Minister Sherif Fathy speaks, after an EgyptAir plane vanished from radar en route from Paris to Cairo, during a news conference at headquarters of ministry in Cairo, Egypt May 19, 2016. (Reuters Photo)

Egypt’s aviation minister says an EgyptAir plane was more likely brought down over the Mediterranean Sea by a terror attack than a technical fault.

Speaking at a news conference in Cairo on Thursday, Sherif Fathy said that he did not want to draw conclusions, but the possibility of terrorism as cause of the Airbus A320 crash was “stronger” than technical problems.

The remarks came hours after the EgyptAir flight MS804 en route from Paris to Cairo disappeared from radar with six passengers and ten crew on board.

The aircraft was flying at 37,000 feet (11,300 meters) when it went missing over the eastern Mediterranean.

The EgyptAir plane assuring the following flight from Paris to Cairo, after flight MS804 disappeared from radar, taxies on the tarmac at Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris, France, May 19, 2016. ©Reuters

Elsewhere in his comments, the Egyptian minister stressed that there was no security issues with the passengers, but further checks were underway.

Search efforts were focused near the Greek island of Karpathos, he added.

Meanwhile, the head of Russia’s FSB security service Alexander Bortnikov told RIA news agency that the plane crash was “in all likelihood” caused by a terrorist act.

Egypt’s chief prosecutor also stated that an “urgent investigation” was ordered into the incident.

Egyptian Prime Minister Sherif Ismail further noted that it was too early to rule out any explanation for the incident, including terrorism.

The developments come as Greek defense sources said a Greek frigate discovered two large plastic floating objects in a sea area 370 kilometers (230 miles) south of the Greek island of Crete.

The two objects appeared to be pieces of plastic were spotted close to an area where a transponder signal was emitted earlier, the sources said.