Nicholas Fondacaro

Throughout the entire legislative process, the liberal media were deeply invested in spreading as much disinformation about the GOP tax reform bill as possible. And now that the bill that they worked so hard to sink was actually law, NBC Nightly News spent part of Tuesday’s broadcast complaining about how confused people were and how they were in a holiday season panic following tax conversations around the dinner table on Christmas.

In these final days of 2017, the new tax law has many Americans still trying to figure it all out,” announced fill-in anchor Craig Melvin. “One of the most confusing questions? Whether you should pay some of next year’s taxes before the end of this year.

NBC reporter Stephanie Gosk was in a tax collection office in Montclair, New Jersey where the phones were ringing off the hook during a normally quiet time of the year. “Property owners here and around the country are in something of a panic. A know-it-all relative at holiday table probably told them: ‘Better prepay those property taxes to save money before the new tax law kicks in,’” she reported.

According to Gosk, if they filed their property taxes now they “may” be able to write it off on their taxes this year. “’May’ because it depends on a number of factors. Something accountant Matt Meyer has had to explain to Chicago area clients in a deluge of panicked calls,” she added. Meyer complained to her about how the “tax bill was supposed to simplify things and it really hasn’t.

Many taxpayers don’t realize that the changes won’t be a factor in this year’s returns. They’ll see the full impact come April 2019,” she noted. “Craig, the takeaway is this, if you’re confused, you’re actually not alone.

 

 

But why are so many people confused about the bill? It’s because of the misinformation and smear campaign of the liberal media. NBC themselves own a large share of the fear and panic stoked by the media’s reporting on the bill.

During the weeks leading up to the passage of the law, NBC was airing near daily segments stoking the public’s fear of the bill taking away many popular deductions all because of the evil Republicans were being heartless to the plight of the middle-class people.

While warning that the GOP was “targeting” college students and those with high medical bills, NBC was worried about how they were not seeking the input from Democrats to make the bill better. “Not a single Democrat saying they’ll vote for the bill,” congressional correspondent Kasie Hunt bemoaned at the time. “Last-minute Republican negotiations are focused on how to make sure the bill won’t cost billions more than expected, but those talks don’t include any Democrats.

But when the bill completed reconciliation, it was shown that the GOP preserved the popular student loan and medical expense deductions. And despite their endless fear-mongering about those deductions being stripped from helpless families, NBC completely ignored how the GOP kept the deductions in to aid those people.

The network’s morning co-host Savannah Guthrie hammered House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) and wondered if he was “living in a fantasy world” for saying the bill was going to help the middle-class.

If NBC is going to blame the public’s confusion about the tax bill on Republicans, they’re the ones living in a fantasy world because they’re the ones lying about how the bill works and what it actually does to benefit the middle-class. They have abdicated their duty to informed the public all to advance partisan motives.

Relevant portions of the transcript below:

NBC Nightly News
December 26, 2017
7:09:34 PM Eastern

CRAIG MELVIN: In these final days of 2017, the new tax law has many Americans still trying to figure it all out. One of the most confusing questions? Whether you should pay some of next year’s taxes before the end of this year. We asked Stephanie Gosk to take a closer look.

[Cuts to video]

STEPHANIE GOSK: The phone at tax collector’s office in Montclair, New Jersey, doesn’t normally ring much this time of year.

(…)

GOSK: Property owners here and around the country are in something of a panic. A know-it-all relative at holiday table probably told them: “Better prepay those property taxes to save money before the new tax law kicks in.”

(…)

GOSK: The new law limits property tax deduction to just $10,000 in 2018, but homeowners in high tax states and cities who prepay next year’s bill before the end of 2017 may save money. May because it depends on a number of factors. Something accountant Matt Meyer has had to explain to Chicago area clients in a deluge of panicked calls.

MATT MEYER: It’s ridiculous. Tax season started a month early. You know, usually in month of December we’re going on vacation, we’re taking it easy.

GOSK: Not this year. Meyer and his team are spending time explaining the new law.

MEYER: It means something different for every single person. A tax bill was supposed to simplify things and it really hasn’t.

GOSK: Many taxpayers don’t realize that the changes won’t be a factor in this year’s returns. They’ll see the full impact come April 2019. And for anyone looking to make those prepayments on property taxes, they’ll need to check in with tax collector in home towns. In Montclair, the office will be open Saturday.

[Cuts back to live]

Craig, the takeaway is this, if you’re confused, you’re actually not alone. Reach out to professional, get accountant if you don’t have one, have them look at your financial situation and give you some advice and maybe steer clear of advice at holiday dinner table.

[Laughter]

Depends on your family.

MELVIN: Good advice. Stephanie Gosk, thank you.