(CNSNews.com) – Predicting a very “different” relationship with North Korea, President Trump joined Kim Jong Un Tuesday in signing a document in which he “committed to provide security guarantees” and Kim “reaffirmed his firm and unwavering commitment to complete denuclearization of the Korean peninsula.”

“Today we had a historic meeting and decided to leave the past behind, and we are about to sign a historic document,” Kim said through a translator at the end of their four and a half hours of talks in Singapore. “The world will see a major change.”

When a reporter called out a question about denuclearization, Trump said, “we’re starting that process very quickly – very, very quickly. Absolutely.”

“One hundred percent denuclearization?” he was asked. Trump did not answer.

He also did not answer when asked whether they had discussed Otto Warmbier, the American student who died just days after he was released from a North Korean prison and returned home in a coma almost a year ago to the day.

As the two signed copies of the document, Trump said he believed “both sides” would be impressed with the results of the summit.

“A lot of goodwill went into this, a lot of work, a lot of preparation.”

“We’re very proud of what took place today,” Trump said. “I think our whole relationship with North Korea, and the Korean peninsula, is – it’s going to be a very much different situation than it has [been] in the past.”

“We both want to do something. We both are going to do something. And we’ve developed a very special bond. So, people are going to be very impressed. People are going to be very happy, and we’re going to take care of a very big and very dangerous problem for the world.”

He said he and Kim had spent a lot of time together — “very intensive time.”

“I would actually say that it worked for both of us far better than anybody could have expected

This is going to lead to more and more and more and, it’s an honor to be with you, very great honor.”

As the two men stood to leave a reporter asked Trump whether he’d invite Kim to the White House.

“Absolutely, I will.”

Commitments

The document signed by the two men (full text below) comprised a series of commitments, with four main elements:

–The two sides agreed to establish new relations, “in accordance with the desire of the peoples of the two countries for peace and prosperity.”

–The two sides agreed to “join their efforts to build a lasting and stable peace regime on the Korean peninsula.”

–North Korea, reaffirming the declaration it signed at Kim’s April 27 summit with South Korean President Moon Jae-in, committed to “work towards complete denuclearization of the Korean peninsula.”

–The two sides committed to recovering POW/MIA remains, and immediately repatriate those already identified.

According to the Pentagon’s POW/MIA Accounting Agency, more than 7,800 American personnel remain unaccounted for from the 1950-53 Korean War.

The two sides also committed to hold follow-up talks, led by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and North Korean counterparts, “at the earliest possible date,” to implement the summit outcomes.

Shortly before the signing ceremony, Trump told reporters the talks had gone “better than anybody could have expected.”

“It’s going great,” Trump told reporters as he and Kim strolled through the hotel grounds. “We had a really fantastic meeting, a lot of progress. Really very positive, I think better than anybody could have expected. Top of the line, really good.”

The two then strolled back to the building, pausing on the way for Kim to take a brief glimpse into the presidential vehicle nicknamed “The Beast.”

The positive tone stood in stark contrast to some of the language used by both sides in the recent past.

Just last September, Trump used his speech at the U.N. General Assembly to derisively label Kim Jong Un “rocket man,” flailing the “depraved” regime in Pyongyang for human rights abuses and a “reckless pursuit of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles.”

He warned that if forced to defend itself or its allies, the U.S. could “totally destroy North Korea.”

National Security Advisor John Bolton speaks to Kim Jong Un, obscured behind President Trump, shortly before the two leaders signed a document at the end of their summit. The regime in Pyongyang has called Bolton ‘human scum.’ (Screen capture: YouTube)

The North Korean dictator’s response came in a personal statement in which he described Trump as “mentally deranged” and a “dotard,” and said the U.S. would “pay dearly” for his threat.

His foreign minister, Ri Yong-ho, in his own speech in New York, added to the lexicon of insults, calling Trump “Commander in Grief” and “President Evil.”

Fast forward nine months, and Tuesday’s extraordinary summit saw Trump and Kim smiling and shaking hands, with the American president calling the encounter “a great honor” and predicting a “terrific relationship.”

Those sitting across a table during their expanded bilateral meeting included Ri and National Security Advisor John Bolton, who – together with Vice President Mike Pence – has been targeted with the epithet “human scum” by Kim’s media outlets.

Text of the statement:

President Donald J. Trump of the United States of America and Chairman Kim Jong Un of the State Affairs Commission of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) held a first, historic summit in Singapore on June 12, 2018.

President Trump and Chairman Kim Jong Un conducted a comprehensive, in-depth, and sincere exchange of opinions on the issues related to the establishment of new U.S.-DPRK relations and the building of a lasting and robust peace regime on the Korean Peninsula. President Trump committed to provide security guarantees to the DPRK, and Chairman Kim Jong Un reaffirmed his firm and unwavering commitment to complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

Convinced that the establishment of new U.S.-DPRK relations will contribute to the peace and prosperity of the Korean Peninsula and of the world, and recognizing that mutual confidence building can promote the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, President Trump and Chairman Kim Jong Un state the following:

1. The United States and the DPRK commit to establish new U.S.-DPRK relations in accordance with the desire of the peoples of the two countries for peace and prosperity.

2. The United States and the DPRK will join their efforts to build a lasting and stable peace regime on the Korean Peninsula.

3. Reaffirming the April 27, 2018 Panmunjom Declaration, the DPRK commits to work towards complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

4. The United States and the DPRK commit to recovering POW/MIA remains, including the immediate repatriation of those already identified.

Having acknowledged that the U.S.-DPRK summit — the first in history — was an epochal event of great significance and overcoming decades of tensions and hostilities between the two countries and for the opening of a new future, President Trump and Chairman Kim Jong Un commit to implement the stipulations in this joint statement fully and expeditiously. The United States and the DPRK commit to hold follow-on negotiations led by the U.S. Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, and a relevant high-level DPRK official, at the earliest possible date, to implement the outcomes of the U.S.-DPRK summit.

President Donald J. Trump of the United States of America and Chairman Kim Jong Un of the State Affairs Commission of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea have committed to cooperate for the development of new U.S.-DPRK relations and for the promotion of peace, prosperity, and security of the Korean Peninsula and of the world.

June 12, 2018

Sentosa Island, Singapore