Sen. John McCain will resign his US Senate seat on July 4, 2018, and the seat has been “quietly offered” to his wife Cindy McCain by Arizona’s governor, according to one of John McCain’s aides.

The aide indicated that despite being unable to perform his duties for almost a year, Sen. McCain wanted to wait until June 1 to resign, so that his seat would not be on the ballot along with retiring Jeff Flake. Instead, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey will now appoint a Senator to serve until the 2020 election.

The aide said that Ducey has already quietly offered McCain’s seat to Cindy, but the 64-year-old wife of Senator John McCain has made no decision as of yet regarding the $200,000 salary that comes with a hefty benefits package and generous allowances for other expenses  “Understandably, she doesn’t want to think about it,” he added.

The tactical maneuver by Sen. McCain has many wondering how a spouse can take over a seat in 2018. Don’t we live in a democracy? Aren’t our elected representatives supposed to be chosen by the people?

Santa Monica Observer reports: Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) was disgnosed with a brain tumor in July, 2017. The 81-year-old symbol of “never-Trump” Republicans, has not been seen in the US Capitol since December.

“If McCain leaves office before May 30, the Post indicated, his Senate seat will be on the ballot in Arizona in November 2018, as will that of his retiring junior colleague, Republican Sen. Jeff Flake. After May 30, the new senator – who would be appointed by Republican Gov. Doug Ducey – would serve through 2020.”

Speculation on who would replace the Arizona Senator has become a DC parlor game, almost. The Washington Post reported that a list of possible successors is circulating in the whispering Republican class, and includes McCain’s wife, Cindy McCain, and former US Sen. Jon Kyl.

In March, White House communications aide Kelly Sadler said that the party didn’t need to worry about Senator John McCain’s opposition to President Trump’s nominee for CIA director because “it doesn’t matter, he’s dying anyway.” A week later, deputy press secretary Raj Shah said in a statement: “Kelly Sadler is no longer employed within the Executive Office of the President.”

Under normal circumstances one would expect the White House to quickly fire an aide who mocked a senator battling brain cancer, but that’s not what happened. Sadler made the remark nearly a month before she was fired. Meghan McCain, the senator’s daughter, said that Sadler called her to say she was sorry and promised to apologize publicly as well, but never did.