San Francisco's board of supervisors voted unanimously to ban plastic straws and single-use cutlery but remain tolerant of public defecation.

Using a plastic straw in San Francisco will now get you into more trouble than pooping in the street.

San Francisco’s board of supervisors voted unanimously to ban plastic straws and single-use cutlery, according to Bay Area reports — however the mayor has doubled down on refusing to implement penalties against people who defecate in the street.

According to ABC7, the legislation proposed by Supervisor Katy Tang not only includes the elimination of plastic straws, but many non-recyclable plastic items like coffee stirrers. Because San Francisco uses 1-million plastic straws a day, the issue took center stage.

Critics of San Francisco’s Democrat leadership have criticized the new law, claiming there are far more pressing issues in the city, in particular the deluge of human feces on streets and sidewalks.

San Francisco mayor London Breed acknowledged the problem facing the city in recent interview, admitting there is an unprecedented amount of filth, grime, disease and feces in the street.

“I will say there is more feces on the sidewalks than I’ve ever seen growing up here,” Breed said.  “That is a huge problem and we are not just talking about from dogs — we’re talking about from humans.

NBC Bay Area reports: SF Mayor London Breed, in her first one-on-one interview since taking office, said homeless advocacy groups that receive funding from the city need to better educate the homeless to “clean up after themselves.”

“I work hard to make sure your programs are funded for the purposes of trying to get these individuals help, and what I am asking you to do is work with your clients and ask them to at least have respect for the community — at least, clean up after themselves and show respect to one another and people in the neighborhood,” Breed told the Investigative Unit, referencing her conversations with nonprofit groups aimed at serving the homeless.

When pressed about whether her plan calls for harsher penalties against those who litter or defecate on city streets, Breed said “I didn’t express anything about a penalty.”  Instead, the mayor said she has encouraged nonprofits “to talk to their clients, who, unfortunately, were mostly responsible for the conditions of our streets.”