The social network is predicting your trustworthiness in a bid to fight fake news

Your Facebook usage is being monitored, and may be converted in a trustworthiness score

The rating system was revealed in a report by the Washington Post – and later confirmed by Facebook to The Sun – which says it’s in place to “help identify malicious actors”.

Facebook tracks your behaviour across its site and uses that info to assign you a rating.

Tessa Lyons, who heads up Facebook’s fight against fake news, said: “One of the signals we use is how people interact with articles.

“For example, if someone previously gave us feedback that an article was false and the article was confirmed false by a fact-checker, then we might weight that person’s future false news feedback more than someone who indiscriminately provides false news feedback on lots of articles, including ones that end up being rated as true.”

 Facebook can see everything you do on the site – which helps build a highly detailed picture of who you are

PA:Press Association
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Facebook can see everything you do on the site – which helps build a highly detailed picture of who you are

Earlier this year, Facebook admitted it was rolling out trust ratings for media outlets.

This involved ranking news websites based on the quality of the news they were reporting.

This rating would then be used to decide which posts should be promoted higher in users’ News Feeds.

It’s not clear exactly what users’ ratings are for, but it’s possible they may be used in a similar way.

But Facebook hasn’t revealed exactly how ratings are decided, or whether all users have a rating.

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According to Lyons, a user’s rating “isn’t meant to be an absolute indicator of a person’s credibility”.

Instead, it’s intended as a measurement of working out how risky a user’s actions may be.

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