David Sinclair and his team at Harvard Medical School claim to be able to reverse the aging of blood vessels and it restores youthful vitality.

Using the synthetic precursors of two molecules naturally present in the body, the scientists also managed to reverse blood vessel demise and muscle atrophy in aging mice, boosting their exercise endurance in the process.

They used a chemical compound called NMN, a NAD+ precursor.

The team gave NMN over two months to a group of mice that were 20 months old—the rough equivalent of 70 in human years. NMN treatment restored the number of blood capillaries and capillary density to those seen in younger mice. Blood flow to the muscles also increased and was significantly higher than blood supply to the muscles seen in same-age mice that didn’t receive NMN.

The most striking effect, however, emerged in the aging mice’s ability to exercise. These animals showed between 56 and 80 percent greater exercise capacity, compared with untreated mice the study showed. The NMN-treated animals managed to run 430 meters, or about 1,400 feet, on average, compared with 240 meters, or 780 feet, on average, for their untreated peers.

To see whether the effects of NMN could be further augmented, the researchers added a second compound to the treatment regimen. The compound, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), is a precursor to hydrogen sulfide, which also boosts the activity of SIRT1.

A group of 32-month-old mice—the rough equivalent to 90 in human years—receiving the combo treatment for four weeks were able to run, on average, twice as long as untreated mice. In comparison, mice treated with NMN alone ran 1.6 times farther, on average, than untreated animals.

Cell – Impairment of an Endothelial NAD+-H2S Signaling Network Is a Reversible Cause of Vascular Aging

Highlights

• Reduced blood flow with age is due to loss of endothelial NAD+-SIRT1 activity
• NAD+ and H2S control muscle angiogenesis and increase endurance in old mice
• The NAD precursor NMN mimics and augments exercise by inhibiting NICD-Notch
• Neovascularization is as important as mitochondria for rejuvenating muscle

Cell Metabolism – Therapeutic Potential of NAD-Boosting Molecules: The In Vivo Evidence

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), the cell’s hydrogen carrier for redox enzymes, is well known for its role in redox reactions. More recently, it has emerged as a signaling molecule. By modulating NAD +-sensing enzymes, NAD + controls hundreds of key processes from energy metabolism to cell survival, rising and falling depending on food intake, exercise, and the time of day. NAD + levels steadily decline with age, resulting in altered metabolism and increased disease susceptibility. Restoration of NAD + levels in old or diseased animals can promote health and extend lifespan, prompting a search for safe and efficacious NAD-boosting molecules that hold the promise of increasing the body’s resilience, not just to one disease, but to many, thereby extending healthy human lifespan.