Democratic senator: We must ‘listen’ to sexual assault victims. Then Clinton rape accuser speaks up.

Dave Urbanski

Amid a woman’s allegations that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh groped her when they were teenagers more than 35 years ago, Democrats are jumping on the development and saying the judge’s confirmation vote should be delayed pending a full investigation.

Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin was among them:

The Illinois lawmaker added a familiar declaration that we all must “listen” to sexual assault survivors — and “regardless of the age of those involved or when the alleged attack took place.”

Well, one woman — who for many years has been issuing a sexual assault allegation against former President Bill Clinton — took Durbin at his word:

When #MeToo works against the left

Democrats and those of their ilk sometimes have a tough time getting riled up when one of their own is accused of sexual assault — and that’s been painfully true when it comes to Clinton, whom Broaddrick accused of raping her when he was attorney general of Arkansas.

Hillary Clinton herself dismissed Broaddrick’s claims — as well as those of Kathleen Wiley and Paula Jones — against her husband, saying there were “clearly in the past.”

In addition, then-CBS News anchor Dan Rather offered the following thoughts to radio host Don Imus in 1999 about why NBC News may have been declining to air a Broaddrick interview on the subject:

They are nervous about, number one, whether this information is accurate, whether it’s really true or not. And then number two, even if it does it turn out to be true, it happened a long time ago, and number three, they’ve gotta be figuring maybe, just maybe the American public has heard all they want to hear about this and are saying you know, “Next. Let’s move on to the next thing.”

When Imus said he’d heard Broaddrick had hoped her story “went away this week,” Rather replied, “Well, let’s hope she gets her way with that.”

Interestingly, Rather — who stepped down at CBS News after his 2004 report on President George W. Bush’s national guard service used documents that weren’t verified as authentic — hasn’t yet weighed in on the Kavanaugh controversy. But he did tweet a link to an article sympathetic to Kavanaugh’s accuser, saying the piece offers “very important context and perspective.”

(H/T: Louder With Crowder)