German Chancellor Angela Merkel is set to fire the country’s head of intelligence, after he exposed Merkel's lies about the Chemnitz riots, according to government sources.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel is set to fire the country’s head of intelligence, after he exposed Merkel’s lies about the Chemnitz riots,according to government sources.

Angela Merkel provoked outrage in Germany when pushed the narrative that the Chemnitz protesters were Nazis and claimed they were engaged in a “manhunt” against immigrants.

However Germany’s respected head of intelligence, Hans-Georg Maaßen, strongly disagreed with Merkel’s statements and claimed she was deliberately assisting the spread of “misinformation” designed to further her pro-immigrant political agenda.

In an interview with the newspaper Bild, the domestic intelligence chief said that he had reason to believe “deliberate misinformation” had been spread.

I share the scepticism towards media reports of rightwing extremists chasing down foreigners in Chemnitz,” he said. He had “no evidence to suggest that the video of this alleged incident circulating online is authentic”.

Calling out the “deliberate misinformation” appears to have cost Hans-Georg Maaßen his job.

Merkel made the decision to get rid of Hans-Georg Maaßen at an extraordinary meeting last Thursday alongside Interior Minister Horst Seehofer and Social Democrat leader Andrea Nahles, Die Welt reported Monday, citing government sources.

Angela Merkel’s government have declined to comment on the report, which comes ahead of another meeting on the controversial issue scheduled for Tuesday.

Politico.eu reports: Maaßen has come under fire in recent weeks for allegedly sharing confidential government reports with the AfD and advising the anti-immigration party on how to avoid being put under surveillance by his agency. He also faced heavy blowback for questioning the authenticity of video footage from the anti-immigrant riots in Chemnitz, and claiming there was “no evidence” of a “manhunt” against foreigners.

Maaßen has admitted meeting with members of the party, but denies he provided advice.

The fate of the intelligence chief has divided political opinion. While Seehofer, who leads Bavaria’s Christian Social Union — which is gearing up for an election next month — previously voiced confidence in Maaßen’s leadership and claimed he does not “see any reason for staff changes,” the Social Democrats and the Greens have been vocal in calling for his dismissal.