A report from the Inspector General at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services shows unvetted doctors with disciplinary problems slipped through the cracks, so did shot records and test results. How easy is it for Gonorrhea, Tuberculosis or Polio to sneak through our borders?

Barack Obama’s administration let a significant number of civil surgeons with skeletons in their closet test migrants for contagious or dangerous health conditions at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Department. One tried to hire a hit man to kill a patient. Another abused his female patients. Background checks were minimal.

The media’s reporting of the Inspector General’s findings are remarkably similar. Everyone is editing out a key piece of information. If they say anything at all, they chose the words carefully and place them out of the way.

As all the mainstream networks report how bad some of the doctors are, which puts the immigrants at risk, nobody is printing the line in the report that says, “USCIS could also be exposing the U.S. population to contagious or dangerous health conditions from foreign nationals erroneously granted lawful permanent resident status.”

The last nine words tend to mysteriously disappear.

The doctors who didn’t have shady pasts weren’t any safer, they weren’t filling out the forms properly, so nobody knows if migrants got the tests or vaccines required. The Immigration Services Officers who were supposed to be checking the forms let blank boxes and bogus entries slide right on by.

The people Obama put in charge didn’t say a word, putting the U.S. population at risk for a pandemic through incompetence, bribery or extortion. Some say it isn’t hard to imagine the consequences if a careless doctor missed Ebola.

“USCIS is not properly vetting the physicians it designates to conduct required medical examinations of these foreign nationals,” the IG writes. “It has designated physicians with a history of patient abuse or a criminal record. This is occurring because USCIS does not have policies to ensure only suitable physicians are designated.”

“Second, when reviewing these foreign nationals’ required medical forms, USCIS Immigration Services Officers are accepting incomplete and inaccurate forms because they are not adequately trained and because USCIS does not enforce its existing policies.”

There are four medical conditions which may make a foreign national inadmissible. Diseases that are communicable, like Ebola, Tuberculosis, Gonorrhea, or Leprosy are immediate disqualifications.

Failure to prove required vaccinations for things like Polio, Varicella or Hepatitis means no admission. Physical or mental disorders “with associated harmful behavior” or drug abuse round out the list.

In June of 2016, Breitbart reported “six diseases that were recently near eradication are making a comeback in the United States.” Tuberculosis, Measles, Whooping Cough, Mumps, Scarlet Fever and Bubonic Plague were almost wiped out in the United States, until recently. Experts point to rising immigration numbers as the cause.

Immigration Services Officers review the medical forms “to verify foreign nationals meet health-related standards for admissibility.” The inspector general found errors in 44 of 151 sampled files.

Some were caused by “ISOs accepting incomplete and inaccurate medical forms. In other cases, the forms were completed and signed, but ISOs did not verify that the civil surgeon who signed the form was active. Finally, in some instances, civil surgeons did not follow CDC’s technical instructions.”

“As a result,” they report, “USCIS cannot be certain the civil surgeons actually administered all required tests and vaccinations and may have granted lawful permanent resident status to medically inadmissible foreign nationals who could pose a health risk to the U.S. population.”

UCIS specifically noted “19 medical forms missing vaccination information or in which the civil surgeon marked the wrong box on the vaccination portion of the form,” and “5 medical forms missing required medical tests, such as tests for gonorrhea or syphilis.”

Analyzing the statistics shows that “330,000 of 1,558,031 adjustment of status applications… with inaccurate or incomplete medical forms… may have rendered the foreign nationals medically inadmissible.”

After auditing the records from October 2013, to June 2017, the Inspector General found that the agency “lacked strong policies as officers made decisions about doctors who had applied to become what the department calls civil surgeons,” NPR reports.

Officials doing the interviews “check the status of each physician’s medical license,” but that is about all they did. “Some civil surgeons have racked up convictions related to fraud, patient abuse and neglect.”

In Georgia, one doctor “tried to hire a hit man to kill a disgruntled patient in Houston. Medical boards in California, Pennsylvania and Texas revoked his license but Georgia’s board permitted him to resume his work.”

“Another doctor had a history of sexual misconduct with female patients. The Texas Medical Board restricted his license for five years, and he was not allowed to be alone with women while conducting physical exams.”

For the bronze third place medal, a doctor was disciplined in California for allowing “her assistants to dilute vaccinations, administer injections with substandard needles and falsify medical records.”

Bottom line is that out “of the agency’s 5,569 active civil surgeons, 132 could pose health or safety risks.”

Complicating things even further, before March 11, 2014, “individual USCIS field offices were responsible for determining whether a physician met the requirements to be designated as a civil surgeon.”

“When the program was centralized in March 2014, USCIS ‘grandfathered’ more than 4,200 civil surgeons, thereby allowing them to maintain their designation without completing a Form I-910 for further verification.”

The head of USCIS, Lee Cissna, isn’t happy about the report but he does agree with all of its findings and he swears he will turn things around in line with all of their recommendations.

“USCIS remains committed to the integrity of our lawful immigration system, and the adjustment of status of an individual to a permanent resident is a core component of the immigration system,” he replied formally to the Inspector General.

Cissna agrees with the OIG “that further actions are needed to enhance the medical admissibility screening process and is already taking these actions.”

The agency promises to build and implement “a more rigorous vetting process, with stricter eligibility requirements for civil surgeons.”