President Trump has laid the groundwork to block migrants from receiving visas or green cards if they cannot speak English to a proficient level.

President Trump has laid the groundwork to block migrants from receiving visas or green cards if they cannot speak English to a proficient level.

Draft regulation from President Donald Trump’s Department of Homeland Security lays out the plan to ensure all migrants to the United States are able to integrate into American society and add value to the economy, rather than become a drain on it.

English language proficiency is a skill that also is relevant in determining whether an alien is likely to become a public charge in the future,” says the draft “public charge” regulation. The regulation is intended to help officials reject migrants who are most likely rely on American taxpayers for their health care, welfare, housing, and wages.

The draft regulation says:

People with the lowest English speaking ability tend to have the lowest employment rate, lowest rate of full-time employment, and lowest median earnings. According to U.S. Census Bureau data, people who spoke a language other than English at home were less likely to be employed, and less likely to find full-time work when employed. In a 2005 study, “on average, workers who spoke only English earned $5,600 more than people who spoke another language.”

Unlike previous administrations, Trump’s White House has acknowledged that people who cannot speak English are more likely to rely on welfare, and become a burden on society. The draft continues:

Data indicate that the rate of coverage of non-cash benefits among those who spoke English either well or very well (about 15 to 20 percent) was significantly lower than the rate among those who either spoke English poorly or not at all (about 25 to 30 percent).

The new regulation was published after a report showed that the English language is losing its place as the primary language in the United States due to the mass-immigration policies of recent administrations. The report stated that “nearly half of residents in America’s top five largest cities speak a foreign language at home”, and that number is even higher in Los Angeles:

Nearly half of residents in America’s top five largest cities speak a foreign language at home, a new study by the Center for Immigration Studies reveals.

Researchers Steven Camarotta and Karen Zeigler analyzed data from the Census Bureau, finding that more than 48 percent of residents in America’s largest cities — New York City, Houston, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Phoenix — speak a foreign language in the home instead of speaking English.

In Los Angeles, California, nearly 60 percent of residents speak a foreign language at home, while 49 percent speak a foreign language at home in New York City and Houston. In Chicago, about 36 percent of residents speak a foreign language at home and in Phoenix, about 38 percent speak a foreign language at home.

But under Trump’s new regulation, it will be more than just English language skills that officials will be looking for when deciding who can migrate to the United States.

In the quest to find the best immigrants that will integrate into our society and contribute to the economy, other factors will include job skills, good health, and age. For example, older, poorly skilled, uneducated and sickly foreigners who would generate few taxes while costing taxpayers a fortune in pensions and health care will be far less likely to successfully migrate to the United States than in the past.

Unsurprisingly, Democratic groups have come out in opposition to the new regulation, in part because legal immigrants tend to vote for Democrats.

On Sept. 25, for example, Democratic activists in New York registered a naturalized, retired Ecuadorean migrant who does not speak English:

However, the Democrats focus on migrants, both legal and illegal, is widely considered to have damaged their election chances, with minority groups including Latins and blacks turning their backs on the party in record numbers.