As was reported yesterday, a lawsuit against Kavanaugh accuser Julie Swetnick was filed by her former employer, Webtrends. The documents from the case have been obtained and published by Big League Politics. The accusations by Webtrends include Swetnick lying about attending Johns Hopkins University, fraudulently claiming unemployment benefits, defaming the company, and that Swetnick herself was engaging in sexual harassment. The case was filed in 2000 in Multnomah County, Oregon, home to everyone’s favorite unhinged liberal paradise of Portland.

From Big League Politics:

Brett Kavanaugh’s third accuser Julie Swetnick was the defendant in a defamation case filed by her former employer, WebTrends. Big League Politics has obtained the court documents from this case.

Webtrends, represented by Perkins Coie, sued Swetnick, who has multiple liens against her including a federal tax lien, and whose ex-boyfriend filed a restraining order against.

“Swetnick began her fraud against Webtrends before she was hired. On her job application she claimed to have graduated from Johns Hopkins University. That university has no record of her attendance. She also falsely described her work experience at Host Marriott Services Corp…Since this initial fraud and despite her brief tenure, Swetnick has continued over the last several months, to defraud, defame and harass WebTrends and its employees,” the complaint reads.

“Shortly after becoming employed with Webtrends, a co-worker reported to WebTrends’ Human Resources department that Swetnick had engaged in unwelcome, sexually offensive conduct. Rather than accept responsibility for her actions, Swetnick made false and retaliatory allegations that other co-workers had engaged in inappropriate conduct toward her. Swetnick then began a leave of absence for suspicious and unsubstantiated reasons and from which she has never returned. During her absence, Swetnick has engaged in a campaign of false and malicious allegations with the intent to harm the reputations of WebTrends and its employees and in the hope that WebTrends would pay her money rather than uphold and defend its reputation,” the complaint reads.

The original complaint also includes:

Beyond deceiving WebTrends, Swetnick applied for an began collecting unemployment benefits from the Washington D.C. unemployment office based on the untrue statement that she had voluntarily left WebTrends in September of 2000

Huetter receiver a complaint about Swetnick from Larry Hountz, a co-employee of Swetnick in June of 2000. At this point, Swetnick had been employed for approximately three weeks and had worked only three days at customer sites. Hountz stated that Swetnick had engaged in unwelcome sexual innuendo and inappropriate conduct directed towards himself and David Anish, another co-employee, during a business lunch. Swetnick’s inappropriate conduct occurred with customers present.

Swetnick also allegedly went on to claim a temporary disability for health problems while employed with WebTrends, but when she failed to provide necessary information, she instead sent a “confrontational letter” to the HR department.

The full text of the lawsuit documents can be found at Big League Politics.

 

The plaintiffs eventually motioned for dismissal of the case, leading one to believe that it was settled out of court.