An aide to George Soros admitted that the leftist funded, at least in part, the infamous Steele Dossier.

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In a presidential primary and campaign season that was filled with dirty tricks, outright favoritism, and strange coincidences, one of the worst things to come from the 2016 presidential election was the infamous ‘Christopher Steele Dossier.’ This dossier, seemingly based on rumors collected by a man who was formerly a member of the English intelligence organization MI6, was used as the basis for warrants to spy on members of the Donald Trump campaign.

However, in addition to a number of other democrat players, according to his own aide, currency manipulator George Soros indirectly financed the ‘dossier,’ and the ‘incestuous relationship’ between a number of leftist individuals and groups.

In a discussion with Washington Post columnist David Ignatius, Michael Vachon, an aide to George Soros himself, admitted that funding for Fusion GPS to ‘research’ and ‘produce’ the dossier was provided through a Soros-backed grant.

According to Vachon, the grant came from an organization called the Democracy Integrity Project, which had financial backing from none other than George Soros.

The Daily Caller News Foundation stated in their article that funding for the ‘Trump-Russia dossier’ was provided by the DIP, which paid Fusion GPS as a ‘contractor’ to continue its probe.

Hillary Clinton, then the democrat candidate for the presidency, also funded it in part, as did the Democrat National Committee, which made payments through their lawyer.

The ‘Democracy Integrity Project’ was founded in 2017 by Daniel Jones, formerly a Senate Intelligence Committee staffer who worked for gun-hating Senator Dianne Feinstein.

According to the Daily Caller, a Washington D.C.-area lawyer, Adam Waldman, met with Jones in March of 2017.

During that meeting, the former Senate staffer told Waldman that he was working with Christopher Steele, as well as Fusion GPS, and that the entire project was being funded by Soros and friends of his from Silicone Valley.

In March 2017, Jones told the Federal Bureau of Investigation, during an interview, that his organization had been paid around $50 million to conduct the investigation.

This dossier was used as the basis for the investigation into President Donald Trump, his campaign, and the people who were a part of it.

When the Barack Obama administration went in front of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act courts, hoping to receive warrants with which to spy on the Trump campaign and its various high-ranking members, they utilized this dossier as the legal and evidentiary basis to get them.

At the time that the dossier was being utilized to get warrants, Bruce Ohr, a top-ranking official in the Department of Justice, admitted that he regularly had contact concerning the document with Andrew Weissman, who currently is the lead prosecutor for the Robert Mueller special investigation into allegations of ‘Russian Collusion’ by the Donald Trump campaign.

At the time, Ohr’s wife was working as an employee of none other than Fusion GPS. Nellie Ohr’s occupation, and Bruce Ohr’s connection to the document, which the FBI knew about, were never disclosed to the FISC, nor was the fact that James Comey described the document as “unverified and salacious” ever provided during the warrant process.

Just as interesting, accounts concerning the document and its use conflicted between Bruce Ohr, Lisa Page, and Glenn Simpson, the founder of Fusion GPS.

Longtime Clinton lawyer and ally Lanny Davis even rebutted a key claim in the document when he was defending Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former lawyer.

Davis pointed out that his client had never been to Prague, which throws into question much of the dossier’s claims concerning Cohen and how he allegedly served as a go-between for the Trump campaign and the Russian government while in the Czech city.

It seems that George Soros had his fingers in many pies during the election, including one that hoped to use salacious claims in order to undermine the ability of the Trump campaign to operate without being spied on.

That dossier, paid for by a host of leftists who hoped to use it for political purposes, somehow became the basis for a number of investigations, for spying on American citizens with warrants received through dishonesty, and for a number of legally and ethically questionable practices carried out by the federal government against American citizens.