Maybe his party should rethink their options before they ask him again to endorse candidates in the next election because results from past two elections including the recently-concluded midterm polls reveal that he is not an effective campaigner, after all. We are talking about no less than former President Barack Obama whose endorsed candidates suffered major losses, prompting some to refer to the Democrat leader as “NOBAMA.”’

Proof of the “Obama curse?” There are several: Andrew Gillum lost. Bill Nelson lost. Joe Donnelly lost. Richard Cordray lost. Stacey Abrams lost.

All the said candidates in competitive states endorsed by Obama turned out to be big losers on Tuesday.

Republican Ron DeSantis will go on to defeat Democrat Andrew Gillum in the battle to be Florida’s next governor. Election surveys ahead of the midterm put Gillum as the likely winner. In fact, even misfiring MSNBC misfired anew when they erroneously aired a test graphic stating Gillum winning over DeSantis the night before the election.

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Actual count now puts 40-year-old DeSantis, an Iraq war veteran, decorated military lawyer and former Florida congressman defeating DeSantis, a Tallahassee mayor, by a razor thin margin. A win is a win, plus the satisfaction of proving the earlier polls wrong, just like in the 2016 case of President Donald Trump no less.

Nelson’s loss was closer with just 34,435 votes separating him from Republican Gov.Scott, a difference representing just.42 percentage points. It’s still within the margin that could launch a possible recount, although that’s not necessarily automatic. For now, it’s still a loss.

Joe Donnelly, meanwhile, suffered a blowout loss in the hands of Republican Mike Braun in Indiana.

Richard Cordray’s opponent, Mike DeWin had 51 percent beating the Obama-endorsed candidate’s 46 percent.

Stacey Abrams is refusing to call it a defeat at this point, irrespective if Brian Kemp has exceeded the critical 50 percent threshold to prevent a runoff in Georgia.