One of the men involved in the migrant invaders’ demand of $50,000 each to ‘go home,’ is a suspect in a terrorist bomb that wounded U.S. soldiers.

Not content with invading the country illegally, the group of contagious migrants camping at the border have now issued a blackmail demand for $50,000 each and they will go home.

Two groups marched to the U.S. Consulate in Tijuana on Tuesday with a list of demands, with one groups demanding extortion money, and the other demanding that the US change its policies to accept more asylum seekers than normal.

However, Alfonso Guerreo Ulloa, an organizer from Honduras, has been implicated in a terror bombing that wounded U.S. soldiers.

“It may seem like a lot of money to you,” Ulloa claimed, “But it is a small sum compared to everything the United States has stolen from Honduras.”

“A letter from the group criticized U.S. intervention in Central America and asked the U.S. to remove Honduran President Orlando Hernandez from office. They gave the consulate 72 hours to respond.”

Many people ask, then what? What’s he gonna do, blow up more innocent people?

Ulloa is a suspect in a 1987 bombing that wounded six American soldiers in Honduras and he delivered a letter to the consulate.

“Ulloa has lived in Mexico since 1987 after fleeing Honduras in the wake of a bombing that wounded six soldiers. Ulloa was suspected of planting a bomb in a Chinese restaurant, but received asylum from Mexico, whose government described the suspected terrorist as a ‘freedom fighter.’”

“An appropriations bill passed by Congress in December 1987 included Congress’s findings that ‘the bomb was directed at American soldiers and did in fact wound American soldiers and an American contractor.’” And the report included the fact that Ulloa was a suspect in the bombing.

Ulloa has posted on Facebook about his role in organizing the migrants in Mexico and posted a lengthy tirade about the 1987 bombing to Facebook in June 2017.

“In the post, Ulloa again denied any role in the bombing, though he admitted to being a member of Popular Revolutionary Forces-Lorenzo Zelaya — a now-defunct left-wing group whose members claimed responsibility in 1982 for hijacking a plane and taking hostages, including eight Americans.”

“A report published by the U.S. government in April 1990 described the group as one of several ‘leftist guerrilla groups [in Honduras] that have resorted to terrorist tactics in the past.’”

However, the Department of Homeland Security has no intention of paying extortion money.

“Secretary [Kirstjen] Nielsen has made clear that being a member of a caravan does not give them special rights for entry into this country and now it looks like some of these migrants understand that the Trump administration’s commitment to enforcing the rule of law, and their own likely lack of a legitimate claim of asylum, means they should return home,” DHS spokeswoman Katie Waldman said in a statement.

Some members carried signs that stated: “You got it wrong, Trump. We asked for jobs and you responded with weapons. That is not polite. If asking for work is troublesome, then I am totally confused. La Caravana.”

Many people agree that ‘asking’ for work and conducting an invasion are two very different things… no wonder they’re confused.

“[T]he overwhelming majority of caravan members are not legitimate asylum seekers — if they were they would seek refuge in the first safe country they entered,” said Waldman. “Yet, predictably they turned down Mexico’s generous offer in search of economic opportunity or family reunification in the United States.”

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