Jimi Hendrix was murdered by the CIA, former roadie claims

Jimi Hendrix was murdered in London by shadowy government operatives who wanted to silence the singer over his antiestablishment views, according to former roadie James “Tappy” Wright.

On Sept. 18, 1970, Hendrix was found dead in London under highly suspicious circumstances. The coroner rendered an open verdict.

Winterwatch.net reports: Hendrix friends suggested he had become quite paranoid at the end. He told one friend that the next time he’d go to his hometown of Seattle, it would be in a pine box.

Hendrix spent much of his last day alive with German figure skater Monika Dannemann (1945-1996). The mainstream narrative holds that on the evening of Sept. 17, Hendrix took at least one amphetamine pill at a party.

Later, at Dannemann’s flat, Hendrix supposedly took nine of her Vesparax sleeping tablets. The recommended dose was one-half to one tablet.

Dannemann stated that “she left for cigarettes” and returned on the morning of Sept. 18 to find Hendrix in a coma at her flat. She called for an ambulance, which arrived at 11:27 a.m. There is no record of who had called the ambulance. Paramedics later testified that only Hendrix was there at the flat, and the door was wide open. Dannemann claims she accompanied Hendrix to the hospital. Paramedics say otherwise.

St. Mary Abotts hospital officially declared Hendrix dead at 12:45 p.m. The cause of death was asphyxiation through aspiration of vomit due to a barbiturate overdose. He just happened to have 42 tablets of Vesparax in his pocket.

In 1975, Dannemann gave hints that there was more to the story. “There is something really behind the whole thing,” she said, “and there’s quite a powerful group behind all that. I think it is the Mafia.”

In 1996, and at the age of 51, Dannemann was said to be ready to tell the truth. She was scheduled to appear on a show when she died under mysterious circumstances. Suicided perhaps.

The best theory is the Dannemann was paid off and threatened to cooperate with the killers. As we have seen with cases like the MLK murder and Oklahoma City bombing, cointelpro operations have an astonishing ability to surround their targets with treacherous people. There seems to be little shortage of treachery in this world.

One of Jimi’s paramours and confidants was super-groupie Devon Wilson, who was described as both “aggressive” and “protective” of Hendrix. Devon was also rumored to be a secret member of the militant political group the Black Panthers. She was loyal to him, expressed grave doubts about his surmise and started snooping around. For her trouble, she “fell” from a hotel’s eighth story five months after Hendrix’s death.

Hendrix associate James “Tappy” Wright says that Hendrix’s manager, Michael Jeffery, drunkenly confessed to killing him by stuffing pills into his mouth and force drowning him with several bottles of red wine because he feared Hendrix intended to dump him for a new manager.

Jeffery has received almost unanimous criticism from Hendrix biographers. Several have alleged that Jeffery siphoned off much of Hendrix’s income and channeled it into off-shore bank accounts. When Experience bassist Noel Redding inquired as to where Jeffery was going with briefcases of the band’s money, he was asked to leave the band. Jeffery openly bragged about Mob connections.

Hendrix claimed he was kidnapped and held by thugs for three days then “miraculously” rescued by none other than Jeffery. Hendrix called this drama staged. Hendrix was too weak as a stoner personality to assert himself against parasitic types. His energy was directed into the guitar, not gutter fighting.

A segment in Alex Constantine’s 2000 book “The Covert War Against Rock” reads, “Friends of Hendrix confiscated financial documents from his New York office and turned them over to Jimi: ‘One showed that what was supposed to be a $10,000 gig was in fact grossing $50,000.’”

In October 2006, a $15 million auction took place of items of Jeffery’s estate, including the rights to Hendrix’s hits “Purple Haze” and “Voodoo Child (Slight Return).” Experience Hendrix, a company formed and owned by Hendrix’s family, said it will prove the family owns the rights to these songs and intends to sue.

In his book “Rock Roadie,” Wright says Jeffery told him in 1971 that Hendrix had been “worth more to him dead than alive” as he had taken out a life insurance policy on the musician worth $2 million and named himself the beneficiary. Two years later, Jeffrey was killed in a plane crash. Jeffery had a tendency to talk too much.

Jimi Hendrix with his manager, Michael Jeffery.
Jimi Hendrix with his manager, Michael Jeffery.

Bob Levine, who was the U.S. manager of the late guitarist at the time of his death in 1970, has an odd conclusion about Hendrix’s death. He claims Hendrix’s murder conspiracy was concocted by Tappy to sell books. Huh?

“I used to talk to Tappy every day,” Levine said. “I’ve known him since the early ’60s. He told me he was putting together a book about his years in the rock world. He told me, ‘Bob, I need a hook for the book. I need a handle.’ He needed something that would be a grabber. Well, saying that Jimi was murdered is a grabber; saying that Jimi was murdered by his manager is an even bigger grabber. But it’s certainly not the truth.”

Levine, who was not an eyewitness, then claims that Hendrix choked to death on wine “while vomiting.”

“He was with a girl who did give him some sleeping pills. Jimi always had a hard time sleeping, so he’d take pills to make him sleep. He had some wine, too, and went to sleep. But when it came time for the wine to come up — he had to vomit — he was literally knocked out by the pills, so he choked on his vomit.”

Attending Surgeon Describes a Wine Waterboarding

The only problem with your account, Mr. Levine, is that John Bannister, the surgeon who dealt with Hendrix at the hospital, said he had very little alcohol in his bloodstream.

“I recall vividly the very large amounts of red wine that oozed from his stomach and his lungs and, in my opinion, there was no question that Jimi Hendrix had drowned,” Bannister said.

He further elaborated to The Times in 2000: “’The amount of wine that was over him was just extraordinary. Not only was it saturated right through his hair and shirt but his lungs and stomach were absolutely full of wine.’ Bannister said he was DOA and likely dead for hours.”

The pathologist who did the autopsy on Hendrix, Donald Teare, reported a low blood-alcohol level.

Was Hendrix a Big Drug User?

Hendrix’s difficulties seem to have intensified after he spoke against the Vietnam war and his support of the Black Panthers. The FBI had a cointelpro file on him. He did a benefit for Bobby Seale and the Chicago Eight.

The set up? Toronto Supreme Court on Monday, Dec. 8, 1969, charged Hendrix with the possession of heroin and hashish found in his flight bag during a routine Customs examination at Toronto Airport in May, 1969. Band members Mitchell and Redding later revealed that everyone had been warned about a planned drug bust the day before flying to Toronto. Both men also stated they believed that the drugs had been planted in Hendrix’s bag without his knowledge.

By 1970 and soon after doing a Vietnam Peace Moratorium rally, for inexplicable reasons there was rioting and chaos (MH Chaos?) at his concerts. Staged perhaps?

Jeffery was devious and would book Hendrix for back-to-back, exhausting performances, keeping him in the air and on the move for long periods. In his last year, he was having difficulty keeping up the pace, and his band broke up. Shortly before his death, Hendrix filed a law suit against Jeffery.

Jeffery’s contract to manage Hendrix expired in December 1970. Without Hendrix’s agreement to renew, Jimi would be worth more to Jeffery dead than alive.

In other star-whacking cases in which the performer was losing his or her edge around the time of their death, sales surge after their takedowns. The created backstory used by the Crime Syndicate again and again are “drug overdoses”. Examples include Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson and Kurt Cobain. Plus, there are substantial insurance payoffs. Nightshade lawyers are in place to profit and fight over the estates. And then, like clockwork, there are the titillating, smear-job, cottage-industry, box-office movies and tabloids made about the star.

Hendrix is still subjected to rumor mongering and misinformation campaigns to this day. While performing, recording and touring, he seemed to be an adrenaline freak, working for long hours. After 1967  and at the peak of his game, he regularly smoked cannabis and hashish, and he used LSD and amphetamines. He was described as a “bad, mean drunk” — that is, when he wasn’t emptying his wallet buying rounds. Band drummer Buddy Miles later claimed Jeffery was procuring and dispensing LSD to Hendrix.

We recommend the following video, “Jimi Hendrix, the Last 24 Hours, New evidence,” starting at minute 00:44:00.

Winter Watch Takeaway: This was a standard Crime Syndicate hit performed by Operation 40 intel and the mob for multiple motives. The target in standard CS Operation Chaos style was smeared. Mike Jeffery worked in military intelligence (MI6) and had mob connections.

Although Jimi was decadent, he does not strike us as a discordian or Luciferian (see lyrics from “All Along the Watchtower below). He had serious social views. Toward the end, his music was less commercial, more spiritual. He wasn’t cut from the same Music Mafia 666 cloth as seen today or with others from that era. He was entirely self-propelled by his unique talent.

There are many here among us
Who feel that life is but a joke
But, uh, but you and I, we’ve been through that
And this is not our fate
So let us stop talkin’ falsely now
The hour’s getting late, hey

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