‘You misspelled, “I apologize for my ignorant and demeaning glib generalization”…’

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(Ben Sellers, Liberty Headlines) Troubles continue swirling in the news industry.

Facing the fallout of financial struggles and embarrassing fake-news feeding frenzies, the latest symbolic smack-down could be the downfall of Tom Brokaw, the last man standing from the heyday of the nightly network news.

Even though some fellow anchors—among them, his longtime CBS rival, Dan Rather; and his NBC successor, Brian Williams—already have been forced out in disgrace for biased and unethical reporting, none represent the sanctimonious pomposity of the bleeding-heart legacy media as well as Brokaw.

Ironically, after recent comments that seemed to violate the Left’s immigration orthodoxy, it may be that 78-year-old former anchor is left hoisted with his own politically-correct petard.

On Sunday, Brokaw ignited a firestorm of controversy by first saying that much of the opposition to immigration was from those who didn’t want “brown grandbabies.”

He later added that “Hispanics should work harder at assimilation.”

Despite the fact that Brokaw was merely trying to characterize what he regarded as the “right-wing” view of immigration, his moment of senile candor brought widespread criticism from the echo chamber, which condemned the comments as “xenophobic.”

While some praised him for his honesty, Brokaw spent much of Sunday on Twitter apologizing for the comments, but not necessarily inspiring confidence in his mental alacrity.

While the Left often jumps to forgive its own, Brokaw could be overdue as a sacrifice to the gods of wokeness and intersectionality.

But it may be more a quiet phasing out than a public flogging.

For many, Brokaw stills represent the public face of NBC News, and top brass would likely hesitate putting the brand at risk for further damage by keeping him on air.

Moreover, as “Meet the Press” host Chuck Todd, also NBC News political director, has shown with his recent climate-change censorship, there is little patience or appetite for representing diverse views.

Or maybe Brokaw, who also spoke wistfully on the “Meet the Press” panel of having known recently indicted political impresario Roger Stone for many years, was simply taking a page out of the former Trump advisor’s playbook that no news is bad news:

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