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  • The Facts:The Environmental Protection Agency recently announced “emergency” approvals to spray sulfoxaflor — an insecticide considered “very highly toxic” to bees — on nearly 14 million acres of crops known to attract bees.
  • Reflect On:Why do corrupt federal regulatory agencies have the power to do what they please, regardless of how many people oppose it? Why do their actions not take into consideration all life on Earth and the environment when they are tasked to do so?

It’s no secret that pesticides have been killing bees in extreme numbers, especially in North America. Many other countries have imposed bans and restrictions on the pesticides that are sprayed in Canada and America. The idea that pesticides are killing bees in mass amounts isn’t really up for debate, and it’s something that we here at Collective Evolution have been creating awareness about for nearly 10 years.

Since 2006, when the term “Colony Collapse Disorder” or CCD was coined in the U.S., commercial beekeepers have reported extraordinary losses averaging 29 to 45 percent per year. Such losses are unprecedented — more than double what is considered normal. In the last several years, neonicotinoid pesticides — both alone and in combination with other pesticides — have emerged as a key catalyst behind this disturbing phenomenon, both because of their direct toxicity to bees and their indirect and cascading effects. If you’d like to learn more about this, there are countless examples and studies online.

The question that’s most important to ask is: Why and how are substances like these getting approved by our federal health regulatory agencies when they are clearly wreaking havoc on human, animal, and insect health? They are destroying nature.

We must acknowledge that our federal health regulatory agencies have been completely compromised. Big corporations have “captured them (our regulatory agencies) and turned them into sock puppets. They’ve compromised the press.” – Robert F. Kennedy Jr. (source)

This is evident thanks to so many examples, including testimonies from employees within these agencies. Known as the ‘Spider Papers,’ a group called the CDC Scientists Preserving Integrity, Diligence and Ethics in Research, or CDC SPIDER, put a list of complaints in a letter to the CDC Chief of Staff and provided a copy of the letter to the public watchdog organization U.S. Right to Know (USRTK).

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