It appears Sandmann may have a chance to extract damages from the Washington Post for defamation after all.

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One of the teenaged boys viciously defamed by the Washington Post in one of the most infamous hate hoaxes perpetrated by a mainstream media organization will have his chance to pursue a defamation claim against the paper after all, after a judge reversed a ruling that dismissed his lawsuit against the Post.

Judge William Bertlesman reversed his earlier ruling on Monday, allowing Sandmann to continue his suit against the Washington Post for defaming him in the wake of a confrontation with a Native American activist at the Lincoln Memorial in January.

The Washington Post ruthlessly slurred Sandmann, falsely accusing him of racially harassing Nathan Philips while in D.C with several other students of Kentucky’s Covington Catholic High School to attend the annual March for Life.

In reality, Philips approached the group of Covington students, loudly banging a gun in a confrontational manner, while Sandmann stood by patiently.

In part because of the Washington Post’s fake reporting, Sandmann became a target of online threats and hate propaganda, much of it painted with anti-white undertones. The Post issued a correction to their story far too late in March, after which Sandmann’s attorneys filed a $250 million dollar defamation suit against the Jeff Bezos-owned mainstream media outlet in March.

The suit was shut down by Judge Bertlesman in July, but the federal judge appears to have had a sudden change of heart in allowing the litigation to continue.

The proceedings will now continue on into the discovery phase, in which Sandmann’s attorney, Lin Wood, will present evidence of the Washington Post’s willful defamation and political bias with intent to malign Sandmann, a 17-year old boy at the time of the incident.

Sandmann’s attorney tweeted in light of the results, expressing his desire to continue the proceedings against the Post.

Elites within mainstream media generally see it as their prerogative to unfairly malign everyday Americans such as Sandmann, even if they’re underage boys. It appears there’s a possibility they could be finally held accountable in Sandmann’s suit.