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Non-profit organizations connected to the notorious mass migration advocate Charles Koch are showcasing an art exhibit in Washington, D.C. that portrays the benefits of immigration according to a report from The Hill.

This “Common Ground” exhibit’s unveiling comes before a Supreme Court hearing on November 12 that tackles the issues of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. This executive overreach by President Obama was eliminated by President Trump, but so-called Dreamers have sued leading to this landmark case.

The exhibit features nine doors with life-size video screens that portray different facets of immigrant life in America.

Stand Together, the principal non-profit arm of the Koch network, brought forward this exhibit alongside non-profit groups such as Americans For Prosperity and the Libre Institute, which are also part of the Koch network.

This pro-immigration immigration exhibit will be open on Tuesday in Washington’s Wharf area, after preliminary showings at Nashville’s Politicon Convention and Miami’s Wynwood Art District.

It portrays nine aspects of immigrant life, beginning with a door title, “Meet Dreamers.” The term Dreamers is a euphemism for illegal aliens who benefit from DACA.

The status of Dreamers will be at the center of the immigration debate before the Supreme Court on November 12, when the Court will rule on the constitutionality of President Trump’s 2017 executive order to rescind the program from the Obama administration.

Under DACA, illegal aliens who came to the country as minors were barred from deportation after registering, paying a fee, and passing a background check. In addition, they were given permission to work in the country, with work permits that are renewable every two years.

The program was supposed to be a temporary measure while Congress tried to create a permanent solution for Dreamers.

In September of 2017, Trump rejected the program, arguing that President Obama overstepped his constitutional boundaries by legislating on immigration by granting work permits on top of deferred action on deportation.

Lower courts in California, New York, and the District of Columbia have blocked Trump’s order so far, thus allowing DACA recipients to keep their benefits and apply for renewals.

In June, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the case to determine if it agrees with the rulings from the lower courts, which includes the Ninth Circuit’s findings that Trump’s order was unconstitutional because of how it was “arbitrary and capricious.”

The Koch portrayal of illegal immigration is simplistic given the demographic and quantity of migration coming into the America.

Conservative firebrand, Michelle Malkin blasted the blatant propaganda, “Koch’s #openbordersinc propagandists put illegal alien students over Americans.” the author tweeted. “Speak up, young conservatives. They’re stabbing you in the back.”

Since the 1965 Immigration Act was passed, the character of migration to the United States has become overwhelmingly Third World and low-skilled.

As a result, there have been strong socio-economic effects such as depressed wages, increased housing demand, and strains on public infrastructure that negatively affect working and middle class Americans.

Not only that, the political effects, which overwhelmingly favor Democrats in the long-term, and the public security impact thanks to the rise of migrant ghettoes, should have Americans across the political spectrum worried.

A move towards a simpler immigration system based on merit, not family reunification, makes more sense at this point.