Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) shakes hands with US Vice President Joe Biden (L) inside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on December 4, 2013. Biden arrived in Beijing to raise concerns over a Chinese air zone ramping up regional tensions, looking to bolster ties while also underscoring …

Source: Joel B. Pollak

The Wall Street Journal editorial board published a demand Tuesday evening that former Vice President Joe Biden answer questions about his son Hunter’s “influence-peddling” and “his own financial dealings — notably regarding China.”

The editorial cites recent reports in the New York Post that Hunter Biden was exploring a lucrative business deal in 2017 with the CEFC China Energy Co. in which “the big guy” — allegedly Joe Biden himself — would be receiving a 10% share.

It notes:

Most of the media is ignoring the emails found in Hunter Biden’s laptop, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t news. Joe Biden has an obligation to answer questions about his son’s influence-peddling and his own financial dealings—notably regarding China.

The emails regarding Hunter’s business in Ukraine have been widely reported. But as intriguing is a May 2017 email thread that includes a discussion about “remuneration packages” for six people as part of a business deal with a now-defunct Chinese energy titan, CEFC China Energy. The Chinese company was international news a few years ago, after the U.S. government charged a CEFC-funded organization with money laundering, and its CEO was detained by Chinese authorities. CNN reported in 2018 that “at its height” CEFC was “hard to distinguish” from the Chinese government.

According to the emails, both Bidens were in line in 2017 to benefit from a deal with CEFC. One email appears to identify Hunter Biden as “Chair/Vice Chair depending on agreement with CEFC.” It also refers to financial payments in terms of “20” for “H” and “10 held by H for the big guy?”

Joe Biden ought to clear the air on this China business in his own political interest. Is he the “big guy” in the email?

The Journal adds that it is critical for Biden to answer questions because China would be his toughest foreign policy challenge if he were to win the November election, and it would be important to know if he had been compromised by personal economic interests.

Read the full editorial here.