Source: Sean Adl-Tabatabai

Sex Pistols frontman John Lydon, formerly known as Johnny Rotten, has praised President Trump for standing up to the corrupt mainstream media.

During an interview with Fox News, Lydon declared that Trump’s attacks on the media were completely justified because they personally attacked him.

“I mean, from day one, I remember like CNN were b***hing about Donald Trump’s tie length. ‘Oh, look at that length, that’s obviously indicating something,’” Lydon said.

“It’s not an issue. Then as time went by, the criticisms became more and more personal.” 

“And I have to say, of course, his responses are personal, because he’s being attacked daily on a personal level,” he added.

“More power to him.”

“I feel for him in that respect because I’ve enjoyed the same hate, the same misunderstanding,” Lydon said.

“You know, we go back to early punk — Pistols, PiL, everything I’ve done in my life. I know what it’s like to stand up for what you think is right and to have to endure that that continuous barrage of self-righteous, smug, pompous, condescending, ‘We know better’ nonsense.

“I know what that’s like.”

Foxnews.com reports: Lydon has been experiencing some of those consequences recently with his criticism of some parts of the Black Lives Matter movement and his embrace of President Donald Trump. Lydon has been a U.S. citizen since 2013, when he supported a very different candidate.

“I became an American citizen because I believed that Obama could change the world for a better place and I truly believed that at the time,” Lydon explained. “I was very disappointed in eight years how little was actually achieved.”

Since switching his allegiances, Lydon has suffered his share of slings and arrows. While some fans see his embrace of the Republican president as a continuation of his punk-rock, shock-and-awe ways, many — on social media at least — are disappointed, calling Lydon among other things “about as punk as a game of golf,” “sadly irrelevant,” and “the bougie punk Rotten turned into.”

Lydon says he is used to it, and is sticking to his guns.

“I think that the rule books must be thrown out. Once you go down that current Democratic Party way, there’s no return from that,” Lydon said. “It’s slowly but surely rule after rule after rule that will stifle the living daylights out of you.”

In Trump, Lydon sees an alternative to that route.

“I met him once. I know, what an offensive fella. But he went into politics as the complete individual. That’s what we want,” Lydon explained. “I don’t like politicians really, generally speaking, not many of them at all. I don’t trust of them. He broke that system, that Washington criminality that’s caused the problems for all of us in the first place.”

Lydon also sees a fellow traveler in the combative leader of the free world beset by bad headlines.

“I feel for him in that respect because I’ve enjoyed the same hate, the same misunderstanding. You know, we go back to early punk — Pistols, PiL, everything I’ve done in my life. I know what it’s like to stand up for what you think is right and to have to endure that that continuous barrage of self-righteous, smug, pompous, condescending, ‘We know better’ nonsense. I know what that’s like.”

Lydon feels the same way about his dealings with the entertainment industry in Los Angeles.  He has several screen credits, including a co-starring role with Harvey Keitel in 1983’s “Order of Death.” 

“Hollywood’s never done me any favors. They’ve always found me very difficult to cope with, that particular Democrat clique,” Lydon said of his love-hate relationship with showbiz. “I’ve been to their parties, their fundraisers years ago and they just they will not be questioned on anything at all. The presumption of the moral high ground is so defaming of truth.”

A combination of the coronavirus crisis and caring for his wife Nora Forster, who has Alzheimer’s, has kept Lydon off the road and out of the studio in recent months, and he says that has given him even more time to think about America’s widening divide. 

“The issues make me have to adapt. If I don’t adapt and I stay rigid to one particular philosophy, then I’m nothing more than an idiot,” he said. “And that’s the problem with being all or nothing, and that’s the great divide we’re now facing at the moment, the idiocy of it all to the left, all to the right.”