Source: Nworeport

About 12% of Americans aren’t getting gifts this year, an almost 7-point growth since 2020, but high-income households will spend five times that of lower-income households this holiday season, according to a poll released Thursday by Deloitte, reports CNBC.

The yearly rate of inflation in the U.S. hit 6.2% in October 2021, the highest in more than three decades, as estimated by the Consumer Price Index (CPI), a likely factor for the spike.

The jump represents a significant rise from the 3.7% annual rise in September.

According to CNBC, consumer confidence hit a 10-year record-low in November, as calculated by the University of Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index. This, as inflation, climbed to levels not seen in many years.

Unsurprisingly, richer families will likely dish out more.

According to Deloitte’s survey, this holiday, 11.5% of people prepare to sit out the season by not spending anything on presents, gift cards, or other items for entertainment. That’s a record amount of Americans on the sidelines, for as long as the

consulting firm has been keeping track.

Deloitte found high-income households will spend five times that of lower-income households this holiday season. The consulting firm polled 4,315 consumers about their holiday shopping plans between Sept. 7 and Sept. 14.

The Deloitte survey discovered that households with $100k-plus income would spend $2,624 each this holiday, up 15% from 2020, compared with $536 for families with incomes less than $50,000, a 22% decline from year-ago levels.

So while trade groups have predicted strong holiday sales this year, that seems primarily driven by the spending of more affluent shoppers.

“There are consumers that are looking to spend a lot. And if I spend $5,000 on a trip to Disney and then a few thousand dollars on fancy and expensive gifts for my family or buy a new car … that’s going to outweigh a host of people who isn’t spending the $700 they might normally spend,” Karthik Easwar, an associate professor at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business who specializes in consumer psychology, told CNBC.

Stephen Rogers, executive director of Deloitte’s consumer industry division, suggested the stark gap in holiday purchases from last year to this year “is a pretty good reflection of the tale of two pandemics, right?

“What starts off as a health crisis turns into a financial crisis if you’re in the lower-income [bracket]. Those of us who have investments in 401ks did quite well,” he said. “You can see from 2019 to 2021, the lower-income group is spending almost half of what they used to spend. And the higher income group is almost double what they used to spend two years ago.”

Deloitte polled 4,315 consumers about their holiday shopping plans between Sept. 7 and Sept. 14.