Source: Nick Arama

Joe Biden did say something right regarding the tornado tragedy that hit multiple states on Friday — he said that whatever federal aid that they needed, he would be prompt in greenlighting it. That’s the most important thing he could say at this point and where the focus should be.

But he couldn’t leave it there, he had to push his political narrative about climate change, as we reported. He did take five questions from the media before he cut them off, and the very first one wasn’t about how many people were hurt or killed. It was about climate change.

A reporter asked, “Mr. President, does this say anything to you about climate change? Is this — or do you conclude that these storms and the intensity has [sic] to do with climate change?” How twisted are they, when they don’t have a lot of opportunities to question him and this is their first question?

“Well, all that I know is that the intensity of the weather across the board has some impact as a consequence of the warming of the planet and the climate change,” Biden responded, without citing any evidence of his claims.

“The specific impact on these specific storms, I can’t say at this point. I’m going to be asking the EPA and others to take a look at that. But the fact is that we all know everything is more intense when the climate is warming — everything. And, obviously, it has some impact here, but I can’t give you a — a quantitative read on that.”

At least he didn’t try to blame Republicans, as some did in despicable hot takes suggesting that somehow Rand Paul was to blame for the tornadoes, or that he and other Republicans should be attacked over the climate change issue because of the tragedy.

But Biden didn’t leave it with the bad take on climate change. He called the tornado that hit a “hurricane.”

Seriously, what is wrong with this guy? Does he not understand the difference? No, Joe, tornadoes are not hurricanes. The White House transcript of the remarks does note that he said it (although they do add “tornado” in brackets as a correction).

This isn’t the first problem that he’s had over the term “tornado.” In September, he claimed that “we don’t call them tornadoes anymore.”

It’s not clear what he thinks we call them now, but maybe that explains why he seems to have continuing issues with the term, although he did use the term in other places during his remarks yesterday. He also seemed confused talking about the “wetlands” of Nevada in the “middle of the country” in September.

It’s more than a little troubling that the occupant of the White House seems to have a fundamental problem identifying such things. But if he’s confused even about the basic differences between hurricanes and tornadoes, no wonder he’s confused about climate change and a boatload of other things.