Source: Jacob Bliss

Fifty percent of Hispanic voters in Arizona, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Texas overall believe the United States is headed in the wrong direction, according to a recent poll.

In contrast, only 37 percent believe that the county is headed in the right direction, while 13 percent said they “don’t know” or did not answer.

Broken down to Hispanic voters in each state, most respondents said the country is headed in the wrong direction except those in Pennsylvania, which was still underwater.

In Arizona, a majority (56 percent) of the respondents said the country is headed in the wrong direction, while only 31 percent said the right direction. Thirteen percent said they “don’t know” or did not answer.

In Nevada, a majority (55 percent) of the respondents said the country is headed in the wrong direction, while only 35 percent said the right direction. Ten percent said they “don’t know” or did not answer.

In Pennsylvania, less than a majority (45 percent) said the country is headed in the wrong direction. However, it was still underwater as only 37 percent said the country is headed in the wrong direction. Eighteen percent said they “don’t know” or did not answer.

In Texas, a majority (54 percent) of the respondents said the country was headed in the wrong direction, while only 38 percent said the right direction. Eight percent said they “don’t know” or did not answer.

The poll was conducted by Bendixen & Amandi International on behalf of “Way to Win,” a Democrat-aligned group. The poll indicated that half of the Hispanic voters in battleground states do not like the country’s direction. This is a critical point for the Democrats and President Joe Biden going into the midterms, which is typically considered a referendum on the president’s party.

“To win next November, we need to have Latinos at the 70 mark for Democrats, so we’ve got to move for these folks,” Tory Gavito, the president of Way to Win, said in an interview. “Right now we see the support, but it’s soft.”

The Democrat-aligned organization’s campaign manager, Kristian Ramos, argued that they can still lose the election if none of the voters show up.

“We could easily lose them to the couch. This administration has done 10 times more on Covid, has done miraculous work on the economy, but Latinos have no idea. And the economic anxiety in this group is off the charts,” Ramos said.

The poll was conducted by Bendixen & Amandi International on behalf of Way to Win between November 8 and 12. The questions were asked in English and Spanish of 1,000 registered Hispanic voters in Arizona, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Texas (250 from each state). The overall margin of error was 3.1 percent and 6.2 for the state samples.