Source: Julian Conradson

On Friday, the New York Supreme Court issued a devastating opinion ruling against the New York Times that confirms the outlet illegally obtained private attorney-client records from Project Veritas.

The Times must now provide Project Veritas with copies of everything that was “Irregularly and Improperly” gathered, and then destroy all records in question.

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From the Court’s ruling:

“The court finds that Project Veritas has met its burden of showing that the subject memoranda were obtained by irregular means, if not both irregular and improper means.

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Ordered: That the defendant New York Times and its agents, employees, legal counsel, or other persons under its control are directed to immediately delete / destroy copies of the legal memoranda prepared by Project Veritas’ counsel, Benjamin Barr, from any computer, cloud server or other data collecting or disseminating sources.”

t’s believed that the documents were obtained during FBI searches of James O’Keefe’s mobile phones and other possessions, which were seized as evidence when Project Veritas staff members and facilities were unconstitutionally raided over Ashley Biden’s diary last month.

Somehow, the records just happened to end up in the hands of the radical NY Times, who published them in a shameless attempt to slander the investigative outlet’s journalistic practices.

The ruling could spur potential legal ramifications for the FBI, who, in all likelihood, illegally leaked the contents of O’Keefe’s phone to the NYT.

Other than vaguely attributing it to “newsgathering efforts,” the Times has refused to provide “ANY explanation” of how it came into possession of Project Veritas’ privileged communications, according to the ruling.

As the court also points out, the outlet even “incredibly” admitted that “no APPARENT bribery” took place when they illegally obtained Project Veritas’ records.

The ruling continues:

There is nothing in the record to show how the Times obtained the privileged memoranda that belonged to project veritas.

That information is solely within the Times’ knowledge and possession,and it has not offered any explanation beyond vaguely stating that the memoranda were obtained through its “newsgathering efforts.”

The Times incredibly admitted that here “no apparent bribery… was used to obtain the memoranda. 

Christmas came early for Project Veritas on this one.

Next up – hold the New York Times and the FBI accountable for their lawlessness.