Source: Geoffrey Grinder

Amazon Style promises to leverage the e-commerce giant’s tech prowess and depth of data to give consumers a “seamless and elevated shopping experience,” the Seattle-based company said Thursday in a blog post. Shoppers will use QR codes to see various sizes, colors, and product ratings, and will be able to send clothes to the fitting room or checkout counter with the touch of a button. Touch screens in fitting rooms will let shoppers request more items without having to leave. Customers will be able to check out using Amazon’s palm-recognition technology.

TRENDING: USS Georgia with 154 Tomahawks on standby against Russia!

Coming more than the full circle in its disruption of retailing, Amazon is wading into the world of brick-and-mortar clothing stores with a 30,000-square-foot shop in an upscale mall in suburban Los Angeles. Customers will be able to check out using Amazon One Palm Pay technology.

If you have a King James Bible, and you read it and believe it, then this story won’t surprise you in the least bit. For those of you who either don’t read your Bible or use a corrupt modern version, this story on Amazon One Palm Pay technology will be a, how do you say, revelation.

“And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right handor in their foreheads: And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name. Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man, and his number is Six hundred threescore and six.” Revelation 13:16-18 (KJB)

One of the amazing things about the explosion and development of technology in the 20th century was that it confirmed what the apostle John faithfully recorded in the book of Revelation. One of the amazing things about the explosion and development of technology in the 21st century is that we are watching it come to pass with our eyes. With all the computers, gimmicks, and gadgets created in the labs, no matter how far out it all seems to go, it always comes back to the right hand and forehead. Funny how that works, eh?

IT BEGINS: AMAZON NOW TESTING A PAYMENT SYSTEM LAUNCHING SOON AT WHOLE FOODS THAT SCANS YOUR HAND AND ALLOWS YOU TO COMPLETE YOUR PURCHASE

Amazon is opening a 30,000-square-foot store with QR codes and palm-scanning checkout

FROM MSN: Amazon Style promises to leverage the e-commerce giant’s tech prowess and depth of data to give consumers a “seamless and elevated shopping experience,” the Seattle-based company said Thursday in a blog post. Shoppers will use QR codes to see various sizes, colors, and product ratings, and will be able to send clothes to the fitting room or checkout counter with the touch of a button. Touch screens in fitting rooms will let shoppers request more items without having to leave. Customers will be able to check out using Amazon’s palm-recognition technology.

Amazon imagines a world where you pay with your hand. Privacy experts aren’t so sure. After the industry endured years of store closures and the pandemic set off flurries of big-name bankruptcies and pushed online shopping to new heights, Amazon and other brands are reconsidering the value of physical stores. More than 5,080 new stores opened across the country last year, barely edging out the number that shuttered for the first time in five years, according to Coresight Research. And PwC’s annual consumer survey found that in-store shopping has +recovered to pre-pandemic levels, with almost half of customers saying they shopped in-person on a daily or weekly basis.

Other retail giants have been tweaking their brick-and-mortar approaches in an effort to reach more customers. Dick’s Sporting Goods is testing “Dick’s House of Sport” megastores with a turf field and track, batting cages, a climbing wall, and putting green. Wayfair, which came to prominence as an online-only retailer, is opening up three new stores in Massachusetts this year. And Dollar General is slated to open dozens of new locations for top shelf, where roughly 95 percent of inventory is priced at $5 or less.

After trying out physical bookstores, convenience stores, and groceries without major success, it makes sense that Amazon is turning to fashion: In 2020, Amazon eclipsed Walmart to become the nation’s top-selling apparel retailer, according to research from Wells Fargo. Amazon does not break out apparel sales in its financial statements, but Wells Fargo projected that its U.S. apparel and footwear revenue would surpass $45 billion in 2021.