Source: GreatGameIndia

Iowa Governor declares it’s time to treat coronavirus like flu and goes onto end all COVID emergency orders. The lockdown reaction to COVID-19 was mainly unsuccessful at rescuing people from the virus.

Iowa’s journey from health emergency to legal normalcy will be completed this month, with Iowa Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds declaring this week that the state’s final COVID-19 emergency measures will be lifted.

Reynolds, like many of the governors, reacted to the pandemic in 2020 by imposing emergency decrees that shut down businesses and prevented people from meeting outside their homes. Last February, Reynolds revoked the most onerous of the regulations, imploring Iowans to be responsible for their own health care choices.

According to the Washington Times, Reynolds said on Thursday that she would let her leftover emergency declarations expire on February 15. Amongst the adjustments will be the elimination of regulations pertaining to “lingering workforce issues” that she claims may be resolved through other ways, as well as the closure of a specialized webpage promoting COVID data. The information would still be monitored and accessible through the state’s usual health portals.

“We cannot continue to suspend duly enacted laws and treat COVID-19 as a public health emergency indefinitely,” Reynolds said. “After two years, it’s no longer feasible or necessary. The flu and other infectious illnesses are part of our everyday lives, and coronavirus can be managed similarly.”

“While our COVID-19 reporting will look different, Iowans should rest assured that the state health department will continue to review and analyze COVID-19 and other public health data daily, just as we always have,” added Iowa Department of Public Health director Kelly Garcia. “The new format will include data points that Iowans are used to seeing, but moves us closer to existing reporting standards for other respiratory viruses. This new phase also assures that our teams, who have been deeply committed to the COVID-19 response, can return to their pre-pandemic responsibilities, and refocus on areas where the pandemic has taken a hard toll.”

The lockdown reaction to COVID-19 was mainly unsuccessful at rescuing people from the virus, while incurring a considerable lot of economic, social, and psychological damage to the population, according to a mass of information.

The left-wing Associated Press acknowledged last March that “California and Florida have experienced almost identical outcomes in COVID-19 case rates,” even though the former implementing several of the harshest draconian lockout procedures in the nation while the latter maintaining primarily unrestricted with Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, and also that the mortality disparity among both Connecticut and South Dakota remained equally low despite the enormous difference in their attitude to lockdowns.

In April 2021, Simon Fraser University economics professor Douglas Allen issued a paper that reviewed upwards of 80 academic studies on lockdowns from throughout the globe, concluding that although lockdowns spared 22,333 years of lost life, it also incurred 6.3 million years of lost life, rendering the policy’s overall long detriment 282 times greater than its benefits due to the cumulative toll of cancelled or postponed treatment for other medical concerns, as well as the psychological damage of lost jobs and other factors.

A research published in October by Marine Baudin, Jérémie Mercier, and Denis Rancourt ascribed most of the COVID mortality toll in the United States to “persistent chronic psychological stress induced by the long-lasting government-imposed societal and economic transformations during the COVID-era [which] converted the existing societal (poverty), public-health (obesity) and hot-climate risk factors into deadly agents.”

A meta-analysis released in Johns Hopkins University’s Studies in Applied Economics reportedly concluded that “lockdowns have had little to no effect on COVID-19 mortality” but have “imposed enormous economic and social costs where they have been adopted.”

Last November, Reynolds signed a bill extending medical and religious exemptions to private COVID-19 vaccine mandates, as well as ensuring unemployment compensation for anyone dismissed for refusing to take the vaccine who can not qualify for one of the exemptions.