Source: Julian Conradson

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that he will not revoke the Emergencies Act, opting instead to allow the Canadian Parliament to proceed with tonight’s vote that will decide if the Act will remain in place.

Flanked by members of his cabinet, Trudeau held a press conference on Monday morning to tell Canadians the “state of emergency is not over,” adding that, despite the freedom protesters being cleared from downtown Ottawa, he needs his emergency powers to remain in effect in order to prevent future protests that could pop up.

The Emergencies Act is not something to undertake lightly. It’s something that needs to be momentary, temporary, and proportional. We’re reflecting on how much longer the emergencies act needs to be in place. We don’t want to keep it in place a single day longer than necessary, but even though the blockades are lifted across border openings right now, even though things seem to be resolving very well in Ottawa, this state of emergency is not over.”

Via True North.

In his last-minute plea to the MPs, Trudeau called the emergencies act, which allowed the tinpot tyrant to send his goons to beat peaceful protesters in the street at random, “necessary” and “the responsible thing to do,” as he implored them to vote to uphold its use.

“For the past few days, parliamentarians have been debating the emergencies act and will be voting on it tonight. I ask all members of parliament to take action against the illegal blockades and to stand up for public safety and the freedom of Canadians. Invoking the emergencies act has been necessary.

Law enforcement agencies relied on it to set up secured areas in downtown Ottawa and at border crossings. It prevented foreign money from continuing to fund illegal blockades and it’s making sure our borders remain open it has been the responsible thing to do.”

Trudeau said that he is “confident” the parliament will uphold his use of the act but also predictably slandered the members who will vote to revoke it. He baselessly claimed that any elected official who votes against him is standing in the way of “our democracy” and “doesn’t trust the government.”

“I can’t imagine that anyone who votes no tonight is doing anything other than indicating that they don’t trust the government to make incredibly momentous and important decisions at a very difficult time. But like I said, I am confident that the majority of parliamentarians will stand up to support our values, stand up to support our democracy, and stand up to support their fellow Canadians.”