Posted BY: Susan Duclos – All News PipeLine

We’ll begin here with a direct quote:

“Suddenly, we’re not only short of gasoline and diesel, but we’re short on fertilizer, which is going to lead to a big food shortage, probably. The most vulnerable in society, both in the West and in developing countries, are going to face huge problems over the next couple of years because of a physical lack of food and very expensive food, if you can get it, or very expensive fuel, if you can get it. And that’s not going to bode well for a lot of governments. Richard Masson Executive Fellow with the University of Calgary’s School of Public Policy

While we do not “eat” fuel or gas, it is absolutely critical to our ability to obtain food, clothes, electronics, just about anything that can be purchased at a store, must be delivered to that store to begin with…usually by truckers, who must have gas.

That is a simple, undeniable equation. 

Trending: Another Food Processing Plant Closes amid Long List of Closures across U.S

Then we look at the recent warnings of upcoming shortages of diesel fuel, diesel exhaust fluid and diesel engine oil, along with truckers explaining issues they are already experiencing, not just with high prices, but being stranded on the highway waiting for gas because a station was out of diesel.

Individual states are hearing dire warnings from Farm Bureau specialists, reported on locally while the national media is more focused on political maneuvering, and protecting the Biden regime from their own policies.

Two specific quotes from The Morning Call:

•A Lehigh County farmer recently called Kyle Kotzmoyer and said something like “I’ve got a tractor hooked up to my corn planter out here, no diesel fuel, and I can’t afford to get any.”

• “We have reached that point to where it is very close to being a sinking ship,” Kotzmoyer, a legislative affairs specialist for the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau, testified to state lawmakers Tuesday. “We are teetering on the edge right now.”

Not only do truckers need fuel to transport goods to the stores, but farmers need it to cultivate the food in the first place.

The issue of gas prices and fuel shortages will inarguably all lead to more severe upcoming food shortages, increasing the pressure on the supply chain, and as we saw from the quote at the top of this article, will last for years to come.

That is something the MSM either ignores, or reports on then buries the story as they rush back to focus on the J6 committee, or the Russia/Ukraine war, or anything that they feel can influence politics. Focusing on the pain and suffering of Americans because the Biden regime is more worried about abortion access  and gun grabbing, is not exactly part of their agenda.

Due to the aforementioned issues of farming, diesel and massive inflation, to which some have dubbed “Bidenflation,” we are seeing even more warnings that food inflation “is only getting started.”

A quote from Capitalist Exploits, via Zero Hedge caught my eye recently:

When the World Economic Forum talks about eating bugs, they aren’t merely suggesting it in the sense that a company marketing a new product would. No. They are telling you.

Trending: Another Food Processing Plant Closes amid Long List of Closures across U.S

Now top all of that off with the “updated list of U.S. plants that have been destroyed, damaged or impacted by “accidental fires,” disease, or general causes,” 99 of them, that Stefan Stanford recently reported on, and we are looking at a disaster in the making.

For some, the gas and food prices, along with the shortages, is already disastrous for them and their families.

Due to the aforementioned issues of farming, diesel and massive inflation, to which some have dubbed “Bidenflation,” we are seeing even more warnings that food inflation “is only getting started.”

A quote from Capitalist Exploits, via Zero Hedge caught my eye recently:

When the World Economic Forum talks about eating bugs, they aren’t merely suggesting it in the sense that a company marketing a new product would. No. They are telling you.

Now top all of that off with the “updated list of U.S. plants that have been destroyed, damaged or impacted by “accidental fires,” disease, or general causes,” 99 of them, that Stefan Stanford recently reported on, and we are looking at a disaster in the making.

For some, the gas and food prices, along with the shortages, is already disastrous for them and their families.
The point here is that the worse the fuel issue, whether from the spiking prices or shortages, the worse the food issue will get, and for many, food is already becoming more expensive than they can afford and have had to change their eating habits. 

The Organic Prepper gives us a look at how quickly we could go back forced food rationing, as we saw many stores do during the beginning of the pandemic lockdowns.

European countries, however, cannot say the same. German supermarkets Aldi, Lidl, and Rewe have been limiting sales of items such as bread, pasta, and cooking oil to “normal household quantities” to prevent hoarding.

There are very real problems at every step of the chain between the fields and the homes of consumers, no question. Are they bad enough yet that it warrants rationing? Let’s think about this a little bit.

As an SQ note on the story above at Steve Quayle’s website states, “shortages are a form of rationing.”

A reader recently sent us a series of emails with images from their local Farmer’s Market, with the subject line: “The Myth of the “Low Priced” Farmers Market.”

The email was lengthy but chalk full of links and facts, but also a personal account of what she is hearing and seeing, so I’ll just quote a portion here, so we can move along to some of the most shockingly high priced items she sent images of.

I’ve read hundreds of articles/books about nutrition & natural health, in which they always recommend, if you’re budget conscious, “buying at your local Farmers Market for low prices”. That hackneyed “journalistic” trope of the “get low prices at the Farmers Market” is a DELUSION.

Where exactly are these mythical “low price” bargain Farmers Markets? I wistfully imagine some Farmers Market out in the  Midwest countryside, or some quaint small town where Jumbo eggs are $2 a dozen that the farmer just pulled from the hens this morning, and Chicken Breast is $3/lb from your neighborly chicken farmer.

Here in the middle of Manhattan, farmer eggs are $12 a dozen.  You want frozen ground Beef? it’s $12.99/lb.

Today a bee farmer told me that they drive 3 1/2 hours from Ithaca, NY to sell their honey here. He said that “this time last year, we paid $2,800 to fill half the truck’s gas tank. This year, we just paid $6,000 to fill half the truck’s tank.”  This gas should last them 3 months. 

I understand and respect farmers’ need to charge the prices that they do in order to survive. They will probably need to raise their prices this Summer.

Reader images below:

I am just showing a couple to represent certain categories, such as the snap peas and garlic above, both items that Americans can grow themselves, even in limited space. With those prices, and knowing those types of prices are going to be reflected on grocery stores shelves sooner rather than later, the importance of growing your own food becomes all the more critical.   

Next up are the meats from the Farmer’s Market, where the prices are even higher than the increases we have seen, and are continuing to rise, at our local grocery stores.

ReaderImage: Beef
Reader I

It is getting to the point, and is already happening to some, where meals with separate meat, potatoes and vegetable sides, won’t be the standard anymore, but stews, casseroles, soups, pot pies, and salads with meats and vegetables inside of them to stretch the meats will be the only affordable way to eat a balanced meal.

Once again, we are looking at emergency survival foods, especially meats, fruits and vegetables, where just a handful of rehydrated portions can be used for each meal, no longer being just for “emergencies,” but rather a way to survive with only limited items needed from the store itself.

We are already being informed by the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) that our fourth of July cookouts will cost 17% more in 2022.

Via Epoch Times (No paywall with this link):

In May, the food price index advanced 10.1 percent year-over-year, with the cost of typical household staples soaring. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics consumer price index report, the price of beef and veal rose 10.2 percent, pork jumped 13.3 percent, ham rose 13.3 percent, chicken rose 17.4 percent, fish and seafood rose 13.1 percent, and eggs soared by 32.2 percent.

Again, let me reiterate, emergency survival foods are no longer just for emergencies, but very well may be the difference between getting your protein in your diet, or forgoing it because the prices are getting far too high.

Another things to keep in mind when thinking “I’ll get it next month,” is freeze dried foods are made from ‘real’ food, meaning those prices are rising as well, just not as quickly, yet, as we are seeing in the stores.