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Second WikiLeaks Developer Dead, Questions Rage As 36-Year-Old Marine Committed ‘Suicide’

January 14, 2018 Leave a comment

The Freedom of Press Foundation released a statement on Tuesday expressing their sorrow and distress over their former colleague, James Dolan. The cause of death has not been released and many are asking serious questions. Some friends suspect suicide over the holidays. The 36-year-old marine worked to produce the WikiLeaks-inspired website SecureDrop.

A former marine who saw action in Iraq, Dolan is described as being a virulent supporter of human rights and in particular the First Amendment. Looking for a way for information to be shared securely and privately in the name of free speech, James Dolan worked with Aaron Swartz to develop the prototype StrongBox.

Since 2012, media organizations such as the New York Times, The Washington Post, and the New Yorker all use the secure website. The media was once hailed as a branch of government where the citizenry could provide oversight to the elected officials. In that dream, Dolan helped provide an independent platform where sources could be kept anonymous and information could be verified and encrypted.

Intended to be used as a means for whistleblowers to step forward without the fear of repercussion, Dolan and Swartz worked to provide a form of interdiction for the American people. Working with Pulitzer prize winner Kevin Poulsen, an independent agency was created to fight for the rights of Americans at home and abroad.

Aaron Swartz believed not only in the freedom of speech but also the freedom of information. The Obama administration mercilessly went after whistleblowers. The United States Government decided to prosecute Swartz for violating the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. A student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Swartz was permitted use of all the school’s technical papers and published writings.

Swartz wrote a script to download thousands of documents from the school. He was accused of copying academic papers, breaking and entering and another 11 indictments in an overzealous case. The 26-year-old was facing up to 50 years in prison. The young programmer is said to have committed suicide in the beginning of 2013.

In his memory, The House of Representatives proposed to amend the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. By removing the felony charges associated with breaking a term of service, the bill would reshape the way the internet is policed.  Breaching of the contract is a federal offense and can be prosecuted as one while the 1986 legislation remains.

The other Aarons Law, Congress has twice tried to push legislation that would make taxpayer-funded research more readily accessible to the public. Most recently the bill was introduced in the Senate by John Cornyn (R-TX) in 2015.

The discussion over internet freedom and intellectual property has been a new fight on a new plane. Leading the charge in such a cause can be an extremely taxing experience. Witnessing a close friend go through hardships is similar to experiencing those hardships yourself.

Co-founder of the website similar to Wikileaks, SecureDrop, James Dolan has followed his old friend. Seeing combat as a marine in the Iraq war, people closest to him say he battled with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Dolan was 36 when he died.

Dolan cited his experience in the Middle East as one reason why he was so adamant in his need to help journalists. The war he experienced made him realize that governments need to be held accountable. Transparency needs to be a vital concern for government administrations.

The Obama administration’s hunt for whistleblowers looks like they were hiding something. The number of whistleblowers increased to the largest levels in American history under President Obama. Whistleblowers from Edward Snowden to Bradley Manning had their lives destroyed for the pursuit of freedom.

Under President Donald Trump, Chelsea Manning has seen freedom, and the pursuit of Snowden has been abandoned. Julian Assange is creeping closer to freedom every day.  Most recent accounts report the editor in chief of Wikileaks has been issued an Ecuadorian passport.

President Trump has taken shocking steps to reinvent what transparency means for government processes. The 45th president has broadcasted open talks with members of Congress on hot topic agendas and showed the people the inner workings of cabinet meetings under his administration.

Top officials of the Obama administration have recently come under scrutiny in the form of FBI investigations. Creating and administrating the SecureDrop platform, Nolan and like Swartz, was privy to a wealth of classified information pertaining to government abuses.

Tech Guru, Who Helped WikiLeaks Get Clinton Emails, Found Dead

January 12, 2018 Leave a comment

WikiLeaks collaborator, James Dolan, who co-created the technology that allowed WikiLeaks to obtain and publish the leaked DNC and Podesta emails, has been found dead. He was 36.

James Dolan was announced dead by Freedom of the Press Association, however besides claiming that he “took his own life over the holidays” few details about the strange death have been made public.

WikiLeaks verified Twitter account provided more context, explaining that James Dolan is the second co-creator of the secure whistleblowing platform to be found dead in suspicious circumstances in recent times.

In 2012, James Dolan, a “quiet, modest, hard-working man” according to those who knew him, worked with Reddit partner Aaron Swartz and journalist Kevin Poulsen to build the prototype of SecureDrop, the open source whistleblower submission system that is used by WikiLeaks.

Poulsen described James’s key role in the project’s creation in the New Yorker in 2013:

In New York, a computer-security expert named James Dolan persuaded a trio of his industry colleagues to meet with Aaron to review the architecture and, later, the code. We wanted to be reasonably confident that the system wouldn’t be compromised, and that sources would be able to submit documents anonymously—so that even the media outlets receiving the materials wouldn’t be able to tell the government where they came from. James wrote an obsessively detailed step-by-step security guide for organizations implementing the code. “He goes a little overboard,” Aaron said in an e-mail, “but maybe that’s not a bad thing.”

Dolan’s colleague Aaron Swartz died in 2013, also allegedly by suicide, while being prosecuted by the US government during Hillary Clinton’s tenure as secretary of state.

Free speech advocates claim Reddit changed after Swartz’s death. While he was alive the site was a beacon for free speech, however after his alleged suicide the fourth most popular website in the US became a partisan liberal outlet that places gags and bans on users daring to question the status quo, or criticize the Democratic Party or its political candidates.

Memorial services for James Dolan have not yet been finalized, however his impact on the battle for free speech and freedom of the press, not to mention the defeat of Hillary Clinton, will not be forgotten.

WikiLeaks: John Podesta Ordered FBI To Remove “Gross Negligence” From Clinton Exoneration

January 12, 2018 Leave a comment

Hillary Clinton’s former campaign chair John Podesta ordered the FBI to remove the term “gross negligence” from the FBI’s exoneration statement, according to WikiLeaks. 

An email from an advisor to Podesta reveals that the Clinton campaign were fully expecting the FBI to use the term “gross negligence” when referring to Hillary’s misuse of a private email server when she was Secretary of State.

Zerohedge.com reports:

In a March 2016 email from former Bill Clinton Chief of Staff Tina Flournoy to Clinton campaign chairman Podesta’s Gmail account, Flournoy included links to two articles concerning the FBI email investigation; one from the Washington Post which minimized Clinton’s actions, and a legal analysis from retired D.C. attorney Paul Mirengoff in which he suggests Clinton was “grossly negligent or worse” and may be in serious hot water. (h/t Mike)

From Mirengoff in Powerline Blog:

First, let’s again examine the statutory language:

“Whoever, being entrusted with or having lawful possession or control of any document. . .relating to the national defense, (1) through gross negligence permits the same to be removed from its proper place of custody or delivered to anyone in violation of his trust, or to be lost, stolen, abstracted, or destroyed, or (2) having knowledge that the same has been illegally removed from its proper place of custody or delivered to anyone in violation of its trust, or lost, or stolen, abstracted, or destroyed, and fails to make prompt report of such loss, theft, abstraction, or destruction to his superior officer, Shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than ten years, or both.”

The only other question I perceive that stands in the way of Clinton having violated Section 793(f) is whether it was through gross negligence that she permitted the information relating to the national defense to to be removed from its proper place of custody or delivered to someone who shouldn’t have gotten it.

It was not ordinary negligence that caused Clinton to permit highly sensitive information to be removed from its proper place and onto Clinton’s private email servers. This strikes me as gross negligence at a minimum. Clinton herself had warned others about the prospect of private email accounts being hacked.

Nor was it ordinary negligence to deliver highly sensitive information to someone lacking a security clearance (in this case, an inveterate gossip). Such imprudence, again, seems grossly negligent or worse. -Powerline Blog

While Mirengoff’s assessment was that Hillary Clinton engaged in grossly negligent behavior, Tina Flournoy did not agree – citing the Washington Post article minimizing Clinton’s actions:

“The argument here would be that Clinton engaged in such “gross negligence” by transferring information she knew or should have known was classified from its “proper place” onto her private server, or by sharing it with someone not authorized to receive it. Yet, as the Supreme Court has said, “gross negligence” is a “nebulous” term. Especially in the criminal context, it would seem to require conduct more like throwing classified materials into a Dumpster than putting them on a private server that presumably had security protections.” -Tina Flournoy to John Podesta (WikiLeaks)

Perhaps Podesta decided to run this past Hillary Clinton’s friends at the FBI, as counterintelligence agent Peter Strzok – who headed up the Clinton email investigation – then removed the phrase “gross negligence” from Clinton’s exoneration statement.

To summarize, former Bill Clinton Chief of Staff Tina Flournoy sent John Podesta an email to his Gmail account on March 9, 2016 – with a Washington Post article containing a link to an opinion by a retired D.C. attorney who thinks Clinton committed Gross Negligence. Former FBI Director James Comey’s original draft from May 2, contained the phrase, and at some point over the next eight weeks, Peter Strzok – the man who headed up the investigation, removed it – materially changing the legal significance of Clinton’s actions, effectively “decriminalizing” her behavior when Comey gave his speech on July 5, 2016.

One wonders if the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) has reviewed this tidbit of information as part of their upcoming report about to be submitted to the Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Congressional investigators – which in all likelihood, assuming their findings are in alignment with recent bombshells, will be the basis for the appointment for a second special counsel and much, much more.

Trump Exonerates Assange: “He’s Free To Come To America”

January 8, 2018 Leave a comment

Trump clears Assange of all charges

President Trump has cleared the path for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to enter the United States without fear of arrest or deportation.

The exoneration comes after days of unexpected and unusual developments surrounding Assange.

On Tuesday, Wikileaks posted a tweet announcing that the U.S. government had finally ended its eight-year-long grand jury proceedings against WikiLeaks – proceedings which were initiated by the Obama administration.

Infowars.com reports: The WikiLeaks tweet referenced a State Department press conference held that day, Jan. 2, 2018, in which State Department Spokesperson Heather Nauert made a strong statement regarding freedom of speech that was couched in a reference to Iran.

The WikiLeaks tweet confirmed the State Department’s reference to freedom of speech in Iran was a coded communication intended to extend the umbrella of free speech and press rights to WikiLeaks in a clear reversal of the policy in which both CIA Director Mike Pompeo and Attorney General Sessions have argued that arresting Julian Assange is a priority. It is not clear that Assange has violated national security laws, even if it can be shown he published U.S. national security classified documents.

Specifically, Nauert said the following:

“We support a freedom of the press here in the United States. We support the right of voices to be heard. And when a nation clamps down on social media or websites or Google or news sites, we ask the question, “What are you afraid of?” What are you afraid of? We support the Iranian people and we support their voices being heard.”

Trump’s attorneys argue Assange’s First Amendment right to publish

In a motion filed with the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia on Dec. 29, 2017, in the case Roy Cockrum vs. Donald J. Trump for President, Trump’s attorneys argued that Julian Assange had a right under the First Amendment to publish the DNC and John Podesta emails, even if the emails were stolen.

The case was orchestrated by Project Democracy, a group run by former attorneys from the Obama administration, arguing that then former Trump campaign adviser Roger Stone had conspired with the Russians to publish the DNC and Podesta emails.

In a 32-page motion defending the Trump Campaign, Michael A. Carvin of the Jones Day law firm and attorney of record representing President Trump, argued that the Trump campaign, and by inference Julian Assange at WikiLeaks, could not be held liable under the First Amendment for a disclosure of stolen information if the information published involves “a matter of public interest” and the speaker was not “involved” in the theft.

In making the argument, Trump’s attorneys relied upon Bartnicki v. Vopper. 532 U.S. 514 (2001), a labor union case in which the Supreme Court ruled a radio station had the right to broadcast a stolen tape of a phone call between the chief union negotiator for a Pennsylvania high school and the chief union negotiator together with the union president.

Technically, Assange has not yet been indicted of any criminal offense in the United States, nor is it clear if he committed any crime.  Under the Supreme Court Decisions New York Times v. Sullivan, 376 U.S. 254 (1964), and in the Pentagon Papers case, New York Times v. U.S. 403 U.S. 713 (1971), a journalist is allowed to accept and publish classified documents provided by other sources.

While Roger Stone’s case is still pending in the District of Columbia District Court, the opinion submitted by President Trump’s attorneys can be seen to have established the basis for pardoning Assange as a pre-condition of allowing Assange to leave the Ecuadorian Embassy in London without U.S. federal authorities seeking to arrest him.

Sweden drops charges against Assange

In May 2017, the government in Sweden dropped the rape case against Assange, ending the four-year long attempt by the Swedish government to arrest Assange via a European Arrest Warrant.

A recent decision by a United Kingdom tribunal also appears to have vitiated the arrest warrant issued by a British court in 2012, after Assange violated his bail conditions to take refuge in the Ecuadorean Embassy.

On Dec. 29, 2017, Assange posted a tweet that referenced an article published by the Guardian on Dec. 14, 2017, citing a United Kingdom tribunal that declared WikiLeaks to be a media organization and a free speech advocate – designations that could carry a legal importance in placing Assange under “free speech” protections both in the UK and in the United States.

Will President Trump pardon Assange?

A QAnon post on the Internet bulletin board 8chan on Christmas Day and a series of messages posted on Twitter by Julian Assange on New Year’s Day appear to deliver a coordinated message that an extradition for Assange from his sanctuary in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London is imminent.

While interpreting posts intended to be cryptic is not a science, those following QAnon understand QAnon has forecast several important developments in code, in an effort to mobilize Internet-aware Trump loyalists.

Ultimately, the question QAnon is raising is this: Will President Trump pardon Julian Assange?

The QAnon Christmas Day post reads as follows:

On Jan. 1, 2018, Infowars.com posted on Scribd.com a decoding of this cryptic QAnon Christmas Day post.

  • Using gematria, the numbers 10, [10-9] are translated into the letters JA, the initials of Julian Assange with “J” being the 10th letter of the alphabet and “A” being the first. The operational window for Assange’s extraction from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London is signaled to be later this week, Jan. 5-6, 2018.
  • That Assange will be extracted with the blessings of the Trump administration is suggested by the designation FDeltaC, referencing a Federal Detention Center of undetermined location.  That the location is outside the United States is suggested by the “Delta” designation.
  • Dec. 25-26 references Emanuel Leutze’s famous painting depicting George Washington’s historic crossing the Delaware River on Christmas night in 1776, with painting posted in synch on the Internet bulletin board 8chan by both QAnon and by the U.S. Department of Defense on Dec. 25, 2017.
  • With the possibility Assange might return to the United States, the “storm” QAnon has been predicting appears ready to begin.
  • QAnon’s reference to “Secured” suggests the path for Assange to return to the United States has been secured at the highest level of the U.S. government, with the knowledge and approval of President Trump.
  • QAnon’s reference to “Floor is yours” suggests this is Assange’s opportunity to drop key files on Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign and the hoax of “Russia collusion” developed by CIA Director John Brennan and propagated to the mainstream media with the assistance of Google’s Eric Schmidt.
  • The comment “Twitter FW” suggests Twitter will be used by Assange to communicate with the public as the extraction mission goes forward.  The additional comment “Twitter [kill_rogue] suggests Assange will post key information on the Twitter account @kill_rogue.
  • Finally, the notation “CONF_WHITE_WHITE” suggests Assange’s initial destination of Switzerland has been confirmed.  Switzerland’s national flag is a white cross (WHITE_WHITE) against a red background.

On New Year’s Eve, Julian Assange posted on Twitter a cryptic string of numbers that appear to be a “Dead Man’s Switch,” linking possibly to a new cache of WikiLeaks documents Assange’s associates would post should Assange be arrested.

Assange’s New Year’s Eve post also embedded a video of the song “Paper Planes” by singer M.I.A. that linked to YouTube.

Again, in what appears to have been a synchronized post, @kill_rogue retweeted Assange’s New Year’s Day post and asked, “What words do you hear in the song?”

Trump Clears Path for Assange to Leave London

January 6, 2018 2 comments

WikiLeaks acknowledge Trump admin ended grand jury proceedings

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In the past few days, a series of unexpected developments have cleared the path for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to leave the Ecuadorian Embassy in London without fear of arrest.

On Tuesday, WikiLeaks posted a tweet announcing the U.S. government had ended its eight-year-long grand jury proceedings against WikiLeaks that was expanded in 2017 to cover the WikiLeaks various “Vault” releases on CIA spy technology.

The WikiLeaks tweet referenced a State Department press conference held that day, Jan. 2, 2018, in which State Department Spokesperson Heather Nauert made a strong statement regarding freedom of speech that was couched in a reference to Iran.

The WikiLeaks tweet confirmed the State Department’s reference to freedom of speech in Iran was a coded communication intended to extend the umbrella of free speech and press rights to WikiLeaks in a clear reversal of the policy in which both CIA Director Mike Pompeo and Attorney General Sessions have argued that arresting Julian Assange is a priority. It is not clear that Assange has violated national security laws, even if it can be shown he published U.S. national security classified documents.

Specifically, Nauert said the following:

“We support a freedom of the press here in the United States. We support the right of voices to be heard. And when a nation clamps down on social media or websites or Google or news sites, we ask the question, “What are you afraid of?” What are you afraid of? We support the Iranian people and we support their voices being heard.”

Trump’s attorneys argue Assange’s First Amendment right to publish

In a motion filed with the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia on Dec. 29, 2017, in the case Roy Cockrum vs. Donald J. Trump for President, Trump’s attorneys argued that Julian Assange had a right under the First Amendment to publish the DNC and John Podesta emails, even if the emails were stolen.

The case was orchestrated by Project Democracy, a group run by former attorneys from the Obama administration, arguing that then former Trump campaign adviser Roger Stone had conspired with the Russians to publish the DNC and Podesta emails.

In a 32-page motion defending the Trump Campaign, Michael A. Carvin of the Jones Day law firm and attorney of record representing President Trump, argued that the Trump campaign, and by inference Julian Assange at WikiLeaks, could not be held liable under the First Amendment for a disclosure of stolen information if the information published involves “a matter of public interest” and the speaker was not “involved” in the theft.

In making the argument, Trump’s attorneys relied upon Bartnicki v. Vopper. 532 U.S. 514 (2001), a labor union case in which the Supreme Court ruled a radio station had the right to broadcast a stolen tape of a phone call between the chief union negotiator for a Pennsylvania high school and the chief union negotiator together with the union president.

Technically, Assange has not yet been indicted of any criminal offense in the United States, nor is it clear if he committed any crime.  Under the Supreme Court Decisions New York Times v. Sullivan, 376 U.S. 254 (1964), and in the Pentagon Papers case, New York Times v. U.S. 403 U.S. 713 (1971), a journalist is allowed to accept and publish classified documents provided by other sources.

While Roger Stone’s case is still pending in the District of Columbia District Court, the opinion submitted by President Trump’s attorneys can be seen to have established the basis for pardoning Assange as a pre-condition of allowing Assange to leave the Ecuadorian Embassy in London without U.S. federal authorities seeking to arrest him.

Sweden drops charges against Assange

In May 2017, the government in Sweden dropped the rape case against Assange, ending the four-year long attempt by the Swedish government to arrest Assange via a European Arrest Warrant.

A recent decision by a United Kingdom tribunal also appears to have vitiated the arrest warrant issued by a British court in 2012, after Assange violated his bail conditions to take refuge in the Ecuadorean Embassy.

On Dec. 29, 2017, Assange posted a tweet that referenced an article published by the Guardian on Dec. 14, 2017, citing a United Kingdom tribunal that declared WikiLeaks to be a media organization and a free speech advocate – designations that could carry a legal importance in placing Assange under “free speech” protections both in the UK and in the United States.

Will President Trump pardon Assange?

A QAnon post on the Internet bulletin board 8chan on Christmas Day and a series of messages posted on Twitter by Julian Assange on New Year’s Day appear to deliver a coordinated message that an extradition for Assange from his sanctuary in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London is imminent.

While interpreting posts intended to be cryptic is not a science, those following QAnon understand QAnon has forecast several important developments in code, in an effort to mobilize Internet-aware Trump loyalists.

Ultimately, the question QAnon is raising is this: Will President Trump pardon Julian Assange?

The QAnon Christmas Day post reads as follows:

On Jan. 1, 2018, Infowars.com posted on Scribd.com a decoding of this cryptic QAnon Christmas Day post.

  • Using gematria, the numbers 10, [10-9] are translated into the letters JA, the initials of Julian Assange with “J” being the 10th letter of the alphabet and “A” being the first. The operational window for Assange’s extraction from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London is signaled to be later this week, Jan. 5-6, 2018.
  • That Assange will be extracted with the blessings of the Trump administration is suggested by the designation FDeltaC, referencing a Federal Detention Center of undetermined location.  That the location is outside the United States is suggested by the “Delta” designation.
  • Dec. 25-26 references Emanuel Leutze’s famous painting depicting George Washington’s historic crossing the Delaware River on Christmas night in 1776, with painting posted in synch on the Internet bulletin board 8chan by both QAnon and by the U.S. Department of Defense on Dec. 25, 2017.
  • With the possibility Assange might return to the United States, the “storm” QAnon has been predicting appears ready to begin.
  • QAnon’s reference to “Secured” suggests the path for Assange to return to the United States has been secured at the highest level of the U.S. government, with the knowledge and approval of President Trump.
  • QAnon’s reference to “Floor is yours” suggests this is Assange’s opportunity to drop key files on Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign and the hoax of “Russia collusion” developed by CIA Director John Brennan and propagated to the mainstream media with the assistance of Google’s Eric Schmidt.
  • The comment “Twitter FW” suggests Twitter will be used by Assange to communicate with the public as the extraction mission goes forward.  The additional comment “Twitter [kill_rogue] suggests Assange will post key information on the Twitter account @kill_rogue.
  • Finally, the notation “CONF_WHITE_WHITE” suggests Assange’s initial destination of Switzerland has been confirmed.  Switzerland’s national flag is a white cross (WHITE_WHITE) against a red background.

On New Year’s Eve, Julian Assange posted on Twitter a cryptic string of numbers that appear to be a “Dead Man’s Switch,” linking possibly to a new cache of WikiLeaks documents Assange’s associates would post should Assange be arrested.

Assange’s New Year’s Eve post also embedded a video of the song “Paper Planes” by singer M.I.A. that linked to YouTube.

Again, in what appears to have been a synchronized post, @kill_rogue retweeted Assange’s New Year’s Day post and asked, “What words do you hear in the song?”

The second line of the lyrics in the song reads, “If you catch me at the border I got visas in my name …”

Assange: “Russia Was NOT WikiLeaks Source, Deal With It”

January 6, 2018 Leave a comment

Julian Assange insists Russia was not the source of DNC email leaks

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has once against denied that Russia was their source of leaked emails published during the 2016 election.

On Monday, the WikiLeaks Task Force account took to Twitter to respond to Neera Tanden, a former Hillary Clinton advisor and current business partner of John Podesta, who accused Trump of colluding with Russia with the help of Assange.

The WikiLeaks Task Force tweeted “Russia was not @wikileaks source. Deal with it.”

Zerohedge.com reports: While Julian Assange has previously denied Russia as their source, this is the first explicit admission by the organization in print regarding Kremlin involvement in leaked emails published during the 2016 US presidential election.

HANNITY: Can you say to the American people, unequivocally, that you did not get this information about the DNC, John Podesta’s emails, can you tell the American people 1,000 percent that you did not get it from Russia or anybody associated with Russia?

JULIAN ASSANGE: Yes. We can say, we have said, repeatedly that over the last two months that our source is not the Russian government and it is not a state party.

The WikiLeaks Task Force twitter account is described as an “Official @WikiLeaks support account,” which exists to “Correct misinformation about #WikiLeaks, amplify our publications.”

While the US intelligence community is apparently sticking to the Russia narrative, President Trump definitively hedged his opinion on WikiLeaks’ source. At a July 2017 press conference before a scheduled meeting with Vladimir Putin, President Trump fielded questions about whether he accepts the U.S. intelligence community’s verdict that Russia interfered in the 2016 election in a bid to help him defeat Democratic rival Hillary Clinton.

Trump responded that others might have been culpable, in addition from Russia. “I think it was Russia and I think it could have been other people and other countries,” Mr. Trump said. “A lot of people interfered. I think it’s been happening for a long time.”

Trump also said the U.S. intelligence community has made mistakes in the past and its judgment is open to question. As he has done in the past when discussing Russian hacking, he mentioned the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003. Intelligence assessments claiming that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction turned out to be inaccurate.

“I remember listening about Iraq,” Trump said. He added: “Nobody really knows. Nobody really knows for sure.”

The WikiLeaks Task Force tweet comes on the heels of a cryptic 3AM (London time) tweet by Julian Assange containing a 60-character code and an embedded link to the MIA music video “Paper Planes.”

Several people speculated that the tweet signaled an imminent new WikiLeaks document release, while others suggested Assange was highlighting Maya Arulpragasam, MIA, for a reason.  As The Guardian pointed out last fall, Arulpragasam has her own “Visa” issues with the United States after her renewal application got mysteriously delayed back in 2014 and has been stuck in limbo ever since…a fact which she attributed to having “supported Wikileaks and stuff.”

There is a song on the new album called “Visa” that takes aim at American immigration policy, something Arulpragasam unwillingly knows a lot about. Her application to renew an expired visa has been stuck in mysterious bureaucratic limbo since 2014. In an age when British popstars with any sort of US fanbase are routinely granted permission to work in America, her two-year hobbling seems unconventional. “Obviously what’s happening to me is very deliberate,” she says. “I don’t know who’s doing it, it’s like fucking playing Cluedo.”

In general, though, she does not pitch her suspicions small. “On paper I’ve supported WikiLeaks and stuff. And now Hillary Clinton is running for president. And until that’s solved I might have a problem, because anyone who ever associated with that website is going to get fucked up. Even if you delivered [WikiLeaks] their takeaway, you are going to be on a list. Do you know what I mean?”

I ask her if she ever worries she’s paranoid and she replies, smartly, that in the aftermath of Edward Snowden’s revelations about the NSA it’s wrong “to even use the word ‘paranoia’ as if it’s a weird condition. Because it’s common as a fucking cold now. Everyone has to have an element of paranoia”

The Russia denial also follows several weeks of unsettling activity involving WikiLeaks and Julian Assange. In mid-December, Three hooded figures dressed in black broke into the Madrid office of WikiLeaks lawyer Baltasar Garzon in a dawn raid. The intruders covered security cameras with tape, and there were no signs that anything was taken – however police are analyzing Garzon’s computer equipment to determine whether or not any files were taken or copied. “They have not taken what they have been looking for,” Garzon told El Periodico, and told Ser magazine that his clients’ security “has not been affected,” and that the people “acted very quickly.”

Hours after the break-in, Julian Assange tweeted a Jimmy Dore video which contains a clip of Assange strongly hinting that murdered DNC IT staffer Seth Rich was their source.

The next week, Julian Assange’s twitter account was mysteriously deactivated for several hours.

And as we reported yesterday, a document found on convicted pedophile Anthony Weiner’s laptop confirms the the Obama administration was implicated in a plot to silence Julian Assange before the 2010 Swedish election – as an arrest warrant was issued for the WikiLeaks founder two weeks after the US Embassy in Stockholm, Sweden sent a cable detailing their concerns.

Meanwhile, Congressman Dana Rohrabacher travelled to London in August with journalist Charles Johnson for a meeting with Assange, where Rohrabacher said the WikiLeaks founder offered “firsthand” information proving that the Trump campaign did not collude with Russia, and which would refute the Russian hacking theory.

After President Trump denied knowledge of the potential deal, Rohrabacher raged at Trump’s Chief of Staff, John Kelly, for constructing a “wall” around President Trump by “people who do not want to expose this fraud.”

Perhaps Trump will take a blowtorch to the hornet’s nest and pardon Assange in exchange for proof Russia wasn’t WikiLeaks’ source, per the deal Rep. Rohrabacher brought back from the Ecuadorian Embassy’s longest-term resident.

WikiLeaks Denies Russia As Source In Response To Head Of John Podesta Think Tank

January 5, 2018 Leave a comment

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Wikileaks has once again denied that Russia was their source of leaked emails published during the 2016 election. In a Monday reply to Neera Tanden, former Hillary Clinton advisor and President of the Center for American Progress – a liberal think tank founded by John Podesta, the WikiLeaks Task Force tweeted “2. Russia was not @wikileaks source. Deal with it.”

While Julian Assange has previously denied Russia as their source, this is the first explicit admission by the organization in print regarding Kremlin involvement in leaked emails published during the 2016 US presidential election.

HANNITY: Can you say to the American people, unequivocally, that you did not get this information about the DNC, John Podesta’s emails, can you tell the American people 1,000 percent that you did not get it from Russia or anybody associated with Russia?

JULIAN ASSANGE: Yes. We can say, we have said, repeatedly that over the last two months that our source is not the Russian government and it is not a state party.

The WikiLeaks Task Force twitter account is described as an “Official @WikiLeaks support account,” which exists to “Correct misinformation about #WikiLeaks, amplify our publications.”

While the US intelligence community is apparently sticking to the Russia narrative, President Trump definitively hedged his opinion on WikiLeaks’ source. At a July 2017 press conference before a scheduled meeting with Vladimir Putin, President Trump fielded questions about whether he accepts the U.S. intelligence community’s verdict that Russia interfered in the 2016 election in a bid to help him defeat Democratic rival Hillary Clinton.

Trump responded that others might have been culpable, in addition from Russia. “I think it was Russia and I think it could have been other people and other countries,” Mr. Trump said. “A lot of people interfered. I think it’s been happening for a long time.”

Trump also said the U.S. intelligence community has made mistakes in the past and its judgment is open to question. As he has done in the past when discussing Russian hacking, he mentioned the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003. Intelligence assessments claiming that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction turned out to be inaccurate.

“I remember listening about Iraq,” Trump said. He added: “Nobody really knows. Nobody really knows for sure.”

The WikiLeaks Task Force tweet comes on the heels of a cryptic 3AM (London time) tweet by Julian Assange containing a 60-character code and an embedded link to the MIA music video “Paper Planes.”

Several people speculated that the tweet signaled an imminent new WikiLeaks document release, while others suggested Assange was highlighting Maya Arulpragasam, MIA, for a reason. As The Guardian pointed out last fall, Arulpragasam has her own “Visa” issues with the United States after her renewal application got mysteriously delayed back in 2014 and has been stuck in limbo ever since…a fact which she attributed to having “supported Wikileaks and stuff.”

There is a song on the new album called “Visa” that takes aim at American immigration policy, something Arulpragasam unwillingly knows a lot about. Her application to renew an expired visa has been stuck in mysterious bureaucratic limbo since 2014. In an age when British popstars with any sort of US fanbase are routinely granted permission to work in America, her two-year hobbling seems unconventional.

“Obviously what’s happening to me is very deliberate,” she says. “I don’t know who’s doing it, it’s like fucking playing Cluedo.”

In general, though, she does not pitch her suspicions small. “On paper I’ve supported WikiLeaks and stuff. And now Hillary Clinton is running for president. And until that’s solved I might have a problem, because anyone who ever associated with that website is going to get fucked up. Even if you delivered [WikiLeaks] their takeaway, you are going to be on a list. Do you know what I mean?”

I ask her if she ever worries she’s paranoid and she replies, smartly, that in the aftermath of Edward Snowden’s revelations about the NSA it’s wrong “to even use the word ‘paranoia’ as if it’s a weird condition. Because it’s common as a fucking cold now. Everyone has to have an element of paranoia”

The Russia denial also follows several weeks of unsettling activity involving WikiLeaks and Julian Assange. In mid-December, Three hooded figures dressed in black broke into the Madrid office of WikiLeaks lawyer Baltasar Garzon in a dawn raid. The intruders covered security cameras with tape, and there were no signs that anything was taken – however police are analyzing Garzon’s computer equipment to determine whether or not any files were taken or copied. “They have not taken what they have been looking for,” Garzon told El Periodico, and told Ser magazine that his clients’ security “has not been affected,” and that the people “acted very quickly.”

Hours after the break-in, Julian Assange tweeted a Jimmy Dore video which contains a clip of Assange strongly hinting that murdered DNC IT staffer Seth Rich was their source.

The next week, Julian Assange’s twitter account was mysteriously deactivated for several hours.

And as we reported yesterday, a document found on convicted pedophile Anthony Weiner’s laptop confirms the the Obama administration was implicated in a plot to silence Julian Assange before the 2010 Swedish election – as an arrest warrant was issued for the WikiLeaks founder two weeks after the US Embassy in Stockholm, Sweden sent a cable detailing their concerns.

Meanwhile, Congressman Dana Rohrabacher traveled to London in August with journalist Charles Johnson for a meeting with Assange, where Rohrabacher said the WikiLeaks founder offered “firsthand” information proving that the Trump campaign did not collude with Russia, and which would refute the Russian hacking theory.

After President Trump denied knowledge of the potential deal, Rohrabacher raged at Trump’s Chief of Staff, John Kelly, for constructing a “wall” around President Trump by “people who do not want to expose this fraud.”

Perhaps Trump will take a blowtorch to the hornet’s nest and pardon Assange in exchange for proof Russia wasn’t WikiLeaks’ source, per the deal Rep. Rohrabacher brought back from the Ecuadorian Embassy’s longest-term resident.

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